940 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, a minimum size inverter and comparing Case V and Case I...

download 940 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, a minimum size inverter and comparing Case V and Case I for the interconnect resistivity, ... in all of the circuits that are studied in

of 7

  • date post

    13-Mar-2018
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    217
  • download

    4

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of 940 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, a minimum size inverter and comparing Case V and Case I...

  • 940 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 62, NO. 3, MARCH 2015

    Evaluating Chip-Level Impact of Cu/Low-Performance Degradation on Circuit

    Performance at FutureTechnology Nodes

    Ahmet Ceyhan, Member, IEEE, Moongon Jung, Member, IEEE, Shreepad Panth, Student Member, IEEE,Sung Kyu Lim, Senior Member, IEEE, and Azad Naeemi, Senior Member, IEEE

    Abstract Dimensional scaling of interconnects at futuretechnology generations presents major limitations to theimprovement of the performances of integrated circuits.In this paper, we investigate the impact of highly scaledCu/low- interconnects on the speed and power dissipationof multiple circuit blocks based on timing-closed full-chipGraphic Database System II (GDSII)-level layouts with detailedrouting. First, we build multiple standard cell libraries for45-, 22-, 11-, and 7-nm technology nodes and model theirtiming/power characteristics. Next, we pair these standard celllibraries with various interconnect files and build GDSII-levellayouts for multiple benchmark circuits to study the sensitivity ofthe circuit performance and power dissipation to multiple inter-connect technology parameters such as resistivity, barrier/linerthickness, and via resistance. We investigate the implicationsof slowing down interconnect dimensional scaling below 11-nmtechnology node.

    Index Terms Back-end-of-the-line (BEOL) scaling, Cu/low-limitations, GDSII layouts, power/performance analysis.

    I. INTRODUCTION

    IN EARLIER technology nodes, the resistancecapacitance (RC) delay of electronic chips was dominatedby the front-end-of-the-line (FEOL) parameters, such asthe resistance of the driver transistor and the receiverload capacitance. With miniaturization of the device andinterconnect dimensions for over four decades, the back-end-of-the-line (BEOL) RC delay became a critical factor indetermining the performances of modern electronic chips. Theresistivity of Cu wires increases rapidly at small dimensionsdue to increasing electron scattering at the grain boundariesand surfaces. This adverse impact of scaling on the resistance,hence delay of wires, prevents fully exploiting the improve-ment in the intrinsic device performance. An earlier work that

    Manuscript received October 29, 2014; revised January 6, 2015; acceptedJanuary 16, 2015. Date of publication February 3, 2015; date of current versionFebruary 20, 2015. This work was supported by the Semiconductor ResearchCorporation Program under Grant 2445.001. The review of this paper wasarranged by Editor M. S. Bakir.

    The authors are with the Microelectronics Research Center, School of Elec-trical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta,GA 30332 USA (e-mail: aceyhan3@gatech.edu; moongon.jung@intel.com;shreepad.panth@gatech.edu; limsk@ece.gatech.edu; azad@gatech.edu).

    Color versions of one or more of the figures in this paper are availableonline at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org.

    Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/TED.2015.2394407

    extended to the 65-nm technology node [1] has shown that theinterconnect latency problem is not only confined in the globalmetal levels where interconnects are long, but also extendto the local/intermediate metal levels. As the interconnectdimensions shrink toward the 7-nm technology node, theimpact of the resistance increases in metal lines and vias haveto be studied carefully to optimize the BEOL architecture.

    In [2], we explored the impact of the resistivity increasein local interconnects for future technology nodes based onGDSII-level layouts of a 512-bit fast Fourier transform (FFT)circuit. The main contributions of this paper are as follows.

    1) We build multiple predictive cell libraries down to the7-nm technology node to enable early investigationof the electronic chip performance using commercialelectronic design automation tools based on the designand analysis flow that is outlined in [2].

    2) We extend the study in [2] to quantify the impacts ofintercell and intracell interconnect technology parame-ters on the speed and power dissipation of multiplecircuit blocks with different layouts and wiring demands.We demonstrate that this impact highly depends on thecircuit.

    3) We investigate the possible issues in slowing down theBEOL scaling below 11-nm technology node to alleviatethe resistance increase.

    Section II outlines some of the important interconnectand standard cell library properties. Section III summarizesour design results. Section IV focuses on the impact of viaresistance. Section V studies an alternative path to BEOLscaling. Section VI concludes this paper.

    II. PREDICTIVE LIBRARIES

    A. Interconnect Definitions

    The interconnect structure and the layer dimensions areshown in [2]. All designs in this paper use the minimumnumber of metal levels that ensures routability. Table I demon-strates the effective resistivity values at these small dimensionscalculated [3] considering the impact of size effects and thetrench area lost to the barrier material normalized to thebulk Cu resistivity (1.8 cm). The barrier/liner thickness

    0018-9383 2015 IEEE. Personal use is permitted, but republication/redistribution requires IEEE permission.See http://www.ieee.org/publications_standards/publications/rights/index.html for more information.

  • CEYHAN et al.: EVALUATING CHIP-LEVEL IMPACT OF Cu/LOW- PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION ON CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE 941

    TABLE I

    NORMALIZED EFFECTIVE Cu RESISTIVITY VALUES

    values are taken from International Technology Roadmap forSemiconductors (ITRS) projections as in [2]. Consideringreliability issues at future technology nodes, and challengesin scaling the barrier/liner thickness to ITRS projected values,we also assume thicknesses of 3.5, 3, and 2.5 nm at all metallevels of the 22-, 11-, and 7-nm technology nodes, respectively.These numbers are projected to estimate the resistivity increasethrough a slower scaling path than the ITRS projectionsprovided that the Cu ratio for the local metal levels are largerthan or equal to 50%. Note that comparing the most optimistic(Case V) and most pessimistic (Case II) scenarios of sizeeffects with ITRS projected barrier thickness, the effective Curesistivity can increase by 2.95 and 2.39 for the local- andintermediate-level wires at the 7-nm technology node. Thickerbarrier/liner material can cause these values to go up to 6.52and 3.22.

    B. Standard Cell Definitions

    The predictive standard cell libraries that are used in thispaper are obtained using the scaling-based library constructionflow [2] to quickly create sufficiently accurate predictivetechnology libraries to design multiple experimental setups forvarious interconnect parameters. For this purpose, the para-sitics of the gate layouts comprising multigate devices havebeen scaled from the existing 45-nm library data, which useplanar devices. The characterization results for minimum sizeinverter, NAND2, and D Flip-Flop (DFF) cells are tabulatedin Tables II and III. Note that the cell delay highly dependson the interconnect scenario at sub-11-nm technology nodes.Considering a minimum size inverter and comparing Case Vand Case I for the interconnect resistivity, the cell delayincreases by 18.1% and 44% at the 11- and 7-nm technologynodes, respectively. This moderate change is due to within cellinterconnects, which are short.

    III. SIMULATION RESULTS

    Using our predictive libraries, we run full-chip layout exper-iments concentrating on three categories of circuits that are

    TABLE II

    CELL DELAYS AT A MEDIUM INPUT SLEW/OUTPUT LOAD CASE FOR

    VARIOUS INTERCONNECT SCENARIOS. INPUT SLEW = 18.75 ps(14.06 ps FOR DFF) AND OUTPUT LOAD = 0.64/0.88/1.76/3.2 fF

    AT 45/22/11/7-nm TECHNOLOGY NODES, RESPECTIVELY

    TABLE III

    CELL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS FOR CELL POWER, LEAKAGE,

    OUTPUT SLEW, AND CAPACITANCE AT A MEDIUM INPUT

    SLEW/OUTPUT LOAD CASE AS DESCRIBED

    IN THE CAPTION OF TABLE II

    represented by an encryption circuit (AES), a low-densityparity check circuit (LDPC), and a 256-bit FFT circuit. LDPCrepresents a group of circuits with a high routing demand. FFTrepresents circuits with a highly regular layout. Most cells inthe FFT circuit that communicate with each other are clusteredtogether. There are a small number of connections betweenthese smaller clusters. The third group of circuits whoseregularity lie somewhere between the former two groups arerepresented by the AES circuit, which is a random logic circuitwith a fair amount of routing demand. The placement androuting results for these three circuits considering a pessimisticscenario of interconnects as described in the previous sectionis shown in Fig. 1.

    For each design, we set the maximum target utilizationto 85%. This number is adjusted in the case of severewiring congestions by changing the initial utilization

  • 942 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 62, NO. 3, MARCH 2015

    Fig. 1. Placement and routing results for AES, LDPC, and FFT consideringa pessimistic scenario for interconnect size effects.

    during placement. For instance, due to the high wiringdemand of the LDPC, the initial utilization is lowered to 25%to provide enough tracks to route the design by increasing thefootprint. FFT, AES, and LPDC are routed with four, five,and six metal levels, respectively. Timing is closed in all ofthe designs in this paper.

    A. Impact of Size Effects on Critical Path Delay

    To quantify the impact of the increase in wire resistivityon circuit speed, we gradually reduce the clock period untilany further reduction results in a negative worst negativeslack value. This is reported as the minimum clock periodin Table IV. For all the designs that are reported in this paper,the minimum clock period value decreases if size effects canbe mitigated from Case I to Case V in Tabl