GCE Physics Unit 2.4 The Nature of Waves - WJEC

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GCE Physics Unit 2.4 The Nature of Waves Progressive waves: Progressive waves transfer energy without any transfer of matter. They can be transverse or longitudinal. Transverse: A transverse wave has oscillations at right angles to the direction of travel. Longitudinal: A longitudinal wave has oscillations parallel to the direction of travel. Phase: A complete cycle of a wave is equivalent to 2π or 360 o . On the diagram above; Points A and E are in phase (phase difference = 2π) as they are at the same point in their cycle at the same time. Other pairs in phase include B and F, A and I, G and K… Points A and C are in antiphase (phase difference = π) as they are at opposite points in their cycle at the same time. Other pairs in antiphase include B and D, E and G… The phase difference is normally expressed as fractions of π. For example, the phase difference between A and I is 4π and between E and F is ½π. Direction of travel Direction of travel H I A B C D E F G J K L Displacement-position graph: This graph shows a section of the wave at a particular time. Displacement-time graph: This graph shows how the displacement of a specific point varies with time. This example is for the point labelled P on the wave as above. Both graphs can be used to measure features of waves and together can be used to make wave speed calculations. Displacement /mm Distance /mm P λ 15 5 -5 -10 -15 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 10 Displacement /mm 15 5 -5 -10 -15 0 0 10 4 8 10 12 16 18 2 6 14 Time /x10 -8 s T Key definitions: Wavelength (λ); the minimum distance between 2 points oscillating in phase. Displacement; measured from the equilibrium position. Amplitude (A); maximum value of displacement. Frequency (f); the number of cycles per second. Period (T); the time taken for 1 complete cycle. Frequency and period are linked by this equation: Wavespeed (c); can be calculated using this equation: Speed can also be calculated using this equation: You will need to be able to use both and at times calculate the speed with one equation to use in the other. Polarisation: A polarised wave is a transverse wave where the oscillations are all in the same direction. A polaroid allows oscillations in only one direction to pass through, the other directions are absorbed. The light that has passed through is now polarised and if directed through another, rotating polaroid the intensity that passes through the second would vary between maximum, when the polaroids are parallel, and 0, when the polaroids are perpendicular. Polarised Direction of travel Oscillation Unpolarised Direction of travel Oscillation c = wave speed in ms -1 f = frequency in Hz λ = wavelength in m T = wave period in s

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Transcript of GCE Physics Unit 2.4 The Nature of Waves - WJEC

Progressive waves: Progressive waves transfer energy without any transfer of matter. They can be transverse or longitudinal.
Transverse: A transverse wave has oscillations at right angles to the direction of travel.
Longitudinal:
A longitudinal wave has oscillations parallel to the direction of travel.
Phase: A complete cycle of a wave is equivalent to 2π or 360o.
On the diagram above; • Points A and E are in phase (phase difference = 2π)
as they are at the same point in their cycle at the same time. Other pairs in phase include B and F, A and I, G and K…
• Points A and C are in antiphase (phase difference = π) as they are at opposite points in their cycle at the same time. Other pairs in antiphase include B and D, E and G…
The phase difference is normally expressed as fractions of π. For example, the phase difference between A and I is 4π and between E and F is ½π.
Direction of travel
Direction of travel
Displacement-position graph:
This graph shows a section of the wave at a particular time.
Displacement-time graph:
This graph shows how the displacement of a specific point varies with time. This example is for the point labelled P on the wave as above.
Both graphs can be used to measure features of waves and together can be used to make wave speed calculations.
D is
pl ac
em en
t /m
10
Time /x10-8s
Key definitions: Wavelength (λ); the minimum distance between 2 points oscillating in phase.
Displacement; measured from the equilibrium position.
Amplitude (A); maximum value of displacement.
Frequency (f); the number of cycles per second.
Period (T); the time taken for 1 complete cycle.
Frequency and period are linked by this equation:
Wavespeed (c); can be calculated using this equation:
Speed can also be calculated using this equation:
You will need to be able to use both and at times calculate the speed with one equation to use in the other.
Polarisation: A polarised wave is a transverse wave where the oscillations are all in the same direction.
A polaroid allows oscillations in only one direction to pass through, the other directions are absorbed. The light that has passed through is now polarised and if directed through another, rotating polaroid the intensity that passes through the second would vary between maximum, when the polaroids are parallel, and 0, when the polaroids are perpendicular.
Polarised
O sc
ill at
io n