Livestock and Fish - Presentation for Discussion with Donors and Partners - June 2013

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Transcript of Livestock and Fish - Presentation for Discussion with Donors and Partners - June 2013

  • 1. Livestock and Fish II (LaF2) CGIAR Research Program (CRP):

2. Research outputs to global development goals MDGs - SDGs 12-18 years CGIAR SLOs CRP goals Common IDOs + Target statements + Theory of Change 9-12 years Value Chain Impact Pathway VC1 Egypt VC2 Uganda VC3 India etc. behaviour direct benefit 3-yr milestones 0-12 years CRP Activities + Outputs (research, capacity building, engagement) IPG Impact Pathway Enabling Environment 3-yr milestones 3. Common IDOs across CRPs Productivity (crop/system/ food system) Food security Nutrition and Health Income Gender Capacity to innovate Risk Management (adaptive capacity) Policies enabling environment/ institutions Environment Future Options Climate 4. Research outputs to global development goals MDGs - SDGs 12-18 years SLO1 Reduce Poverty CRP goals IDO6 Better policies9-12 years Value Chain Impact Pathway0-12 years CRP Activities + Outputs Actionable options Engagement/transformation Process Evidence base IPG Impact Pathway SLO2 Food Security SLO3 Nutrition & Health SLO4 Environment IDO5 Environmental benefits IDO4 Reduce nutrient gap IDO3 More employment & income, esp. for women IDO1 Improved productivity IDO2 More & better supply IDO7 More forage? 5. Theory of Change assumptions Addressing whole value chain will improve relevance, uptake and effectiveness of innovations. Focus and targeting will increase efficiency and the probability of achieving proof at scale. Implementation of demand-driven innovations in the right value chains with the right partners will accelerate the programs progress towards achieving outcomes and impact. A significant number of pre-commercial smallholders can become market-oriented and intensify production sustainably. Pro-poor value chains can compete and generate sufficient incentives to promote investment in intensification. The poor rely on animal-source food produced locally by smallholders and from less formal marketing channels. The poor will consume more ASF if availability, access and affordability of products improve from those systems. Increased and equitable consumption of ASF will improve nutrition and health. 6. Our engagement in a value chain embodies our impact pathway Approach: Solution-driven R4D to achieve impact Year 1 Year 8-12 Relativedegreeofinvolvement Research partners Development partners Assessment Mobilization Best bets Experiment s Evaluation Evidence Design Piloting Lessons Context Advocacy Disseminatio n Attracting investment Implementin g large-scale interventions Knowledge partner Along the impact pathway 7. Increased number of healthy pigs Safe pork and pork products Increased number of off take Improved income from piggery Increased income from other enterprises Better coordination of value chain actors Increased adoption of technologies Equitable distribution of income Better access to markets PROGRAM OUTPUT General assumptions Inputs are available and accessible, Partners are interested and have the resources to scale out the technologies, Good communication strategies, There is sufficient demand, The pig sector takes priority in the policy framework, The right partners are identified, Different stakeholders are willing to be part of the IP General risk i. Religious biases remain Assumptions i. There is adequate demand for pigs ii. Farmers are willing to increase investment in piggery iii. There are favorable market conditions. Risk Disease outbreaks Better prices Assumptions No backlash from equitable distribution of income Assumption Farmers will adapt the improved protocols Farmers are aware of safe pork. Risk Mismanagement/misinterpretation of information on ASF Assumption Incomes are invested in household nutrition Farmers are aware of what constitutes good diets Assumption i. Awareness of negative environmental impacts of poorly managed piggery RESEARCH OUTCOMES INTERMEDIATEOUTCOMES Better animal health approaches Improved feeds and feeding methods Innovative pig husbandry and pig management Better breeds and breeding methods Strong pig farmer groups Policy briefs Innovative linkages to credit providers Incorporation of gender in value chains Increased information on technologies Improved food security Reduced poverty Improved nutrition and health Sustainable management of natural resources Less air and water pollution SL Os Innovative linkages to pig markets Improved profits (VC actors) Improved diets Uganda Smallholder Pig Value Chain Impact Pathway ParticipatoryImpactPathwaysAnalysis 8. Safe pork and pork products Increased number of off take Improved income from piggery Better coordination of value chain actors Equitable distribution of income Better access to markets PROGRAM OUTPUT General assumptions Inputs are available and accessible, Partners are interested and have the resources to scale out the technologies, Good communication strategies, There is sufficient demand, The pig sector takes priority in the policy framework, The right partners are identified, Different stakeholders are willing to be part of the IP General risk i. Religious biases remain Assumptions i. There is adequate demand for pigs ii. Farmers are willing to increase investment in piggery iii. There are favorable market conditions. Risk Disease outbreaks Better prices Assumptions No backlash from equitable distribution of income Assumption Farmers will adapt the improved protocols Farmers are aware of safe pork. Risk Mismanagement/misinterpretation of information on ASF Assumption Incomes are invested in household nutrition Farmers are aware of what constitutes good diets Assumption i. Awareness of negative environmental impacts of poorly managed piggery RESEARCH OUTCOMES INTERMEDIATEOUTCOMES Better animal health approaches Improved feeds and feeding methods Innovative pig husbandry and pig management Better breeds and breeding methods Strong pig farmer groups Policy briefs Incorporation of gender in value chains Increased information on technologies Reduced poverty Improved nutrition and health SL Os Innovative linkages to pig markets Improved profits (VC actors) Improved diets Innovative linkages to credit providers Increased number of healthy pigs Increased adoption of technologies Less air and water pollution Increased income from other enterprises Sustainable NRMFood security Uganda Smallholder Pig Value Chain Impact Pathway 9. Increased number of healthy pigs Safe pork and pork products Increased number of off take Improved income from piggery Increased income from other enterprises Better coordination of value chain actors Increased adoption of technologies Equitable distribution of income Better access to markets PROGRAM OUTPUT General assumptions Inputs are available and accessible, Partners are interested and have the resources to scale out the technologies, Good communication strategies, There is sufficient demand, The pig sector takes priority in the policy framework, The right partners are identified, Different stakeholders are willing to be part of the IP General risk i. Religious biases remain Assumptions i. There is adequate demand for pigs ii. Farmers are willing to increase investment in piggery iii. There are favorable market conditions. Risk Disease outbreaks Better prices Assumptions No backlash from equitable distribution of income Assumption Farmers will adapt the improved protocols Farmers are aware of safe pork. Risk Mismanagement/misinterpretation of information on ASF Assumption Incomes are invested in household nutrition Farmers are aware of what constitutes good diets Assumption i. Awareness of negative environmental impacts of poorly managed piggery RESEARCH OUTCOMES INTERMEDIATEOUTCOMES Better animal health approaches Improved feeds and feeding methods Innovative pig husbandry and pig management Better breeds and breeding methods Strong pig farmer groups Policy briefs Innovative linkages to credit providers Incorporation of gender in value chains Increased information on technologies Improved food security Reduced poverty Improved nutrition and health Sustainable management of natural resources Less air and water pollution SL Os Innovative linkages to pig markets Improved profits (VC actors) Improved diets Uganda Smallholder Pig Value Chain Impact Pathway ParticipatoryImpactPathwaysAnalysis Sequencing? Who to implement? Who to target? Changes in behaviour? 10. PIGS AQUACULTURE SHEEP & GOATS DAIRY Exploiting opportunities to prepare regional scaling-out Comment on Focus, focus, focus 11. IDO Metrics 1. Increased livestock and fish productivity in small-scale production systems for the target commodities (SLO1 and SLO2) Uganda and Vietnam yields / animal of pig meat; percentage pig mortality; Ethiopia and Mali yields of small ruminant meat; flock mortality; kidding rate; Tanzania and India dairy yields per animal; Egypt and Bangladesh fish yields per hectare; Nicaragua beef and dairy yields per animal and per hectare 2. Increased quantity and improved quality of the target commodity supplied from the target small-scale production and marketing systems (SLO1 and SLO2) Quantity, by commodity yields per animal and per unit of land or time, stratified by target systems Market-level volume Quality by real unit prices Intermediate Development Outcomes (IDOs) 12. IDO Metrics 3. Increased employment and income for low income actors in the target value chains, with an increased share of employment for and income controlled by low-income women (SLO1 and SLO3) Increased income among poor people, disaggregated by sex and age. Higher share of women reporting greater control of income from value chain participation. Increased employment in the target value chains, disaggregated by sex, age and poverty status. 4. Increase consumption of the target commodity responsible for filling a larger share of the nutrient gap for the poor, particularly for nutritionally vulnerable populations (women