FIGURE 11.1 Size classification of plankton based on Sieburth et al. (1978). Note the logarithmic...

of 7 /7
FIGURE 11.1 Size classification of plankton based on Sieburth et al. (1978). Note the logarithmic scale on the size axis. Most estuarine zooplankton range in size from ~2 μm (heterotrophic flagellates) to a maximum of ~1 m (large scyphomedusae). ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Yánez-Arancibia. Copyright © 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved ~

Embed Size (px)

description

FIGURE 11.3 Salinity and abundance of E. affinis in the Elbe Estuary during longitudinal sampling (RD = mean river discharge of the 20 days before sampling). The map of the Elbe Estuary shows the distance downstream from the source (numbers = stream kilometers) and the black dot indicates the anchor station, located at stream-km 695. Source: Figure from Figures 1 and 9 of Peitsch et al. (2000). ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Yánez-Arancibia. Copyright © 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved ~

Transcript of FIGURE 11.1 Size classification of plankton based on Sieburth et al. (1978). Note the logarithmic...

FIGURE 11.1 Size classification of plankton based on Sieburth et al. (1978). Note the logarithmic scale on the size axis. Most estuarine zooplankton range in size from ~2 m (heterotrophic flagellates) to a maximum of ~1 m (large scyphomedusae).

ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Ynez-Arancibia.

Copyright 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved

~

FIGURE 11.2 Schematic representation of the dispersion of developmental stage of E. affinis in the middle part of the Seine estuary (Normandy Bridge) as a function of the mean tidal cycle, based on the results of this study. Width of arrows at the top of the figure represents the magnitude of the water velocity during a length of time represented by their length. The different water masses have been identified at the bottom of the figure as a function of the salinity range according to McLusky (1989): oligohaline zone [0.55], mesohaline [518] and polyhaline [1825]. The population abundance increase during the ebb with low constant resuspension and hypothetical migration of adults (oval) and copepodids (square) that dominate the population from the poly- to mesohaline zone in surface and bottom water. In the oligohaline zone around the low slack, when current velocity is low, nauplii dominate the population. At the beginning of the flood when current velocity is maximal, the population is resuspended and adults and copepodids start to migrate (according to the hypothesis of Morgan et al., 1997 and Schmitt et al., unpublished data) to the bottom water while the current is decreasing. Source: Figure 9 from Devreker et al. (2008).

ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Ynez-Arancibia.

Copyright 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved

~

FIGURE 11.3 Salinity and abundance of E. affinis in the Elbe Estuary during longitudinal sampling (RD = mean river discharge of the 20 days before sampling). The map of the Elbe Estuary shows the distance downstream from the source (numbers = stream kilometers) and the black dot indicates the anchor station, located at stream-km 695. Source: Figure from Figures 1 and 9 of Peitsch et al. (2000).

ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Ynez-Arancibia.

Copyright 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved

~

FIGURE 11.4 An example of an estuarine planktonic food web from within the turbiditymaximum zone of the Gironde River estuary in July 2002 showing biomass and flux expressed as gC/m3 and gC/m3/ day, respectively. Estimation of such a food web requires careful measurement of the standing stocks within each pool and grazing rate experiments to quantify the magnitudes of fluxes among consumers. Source: From David et al. (2006).

ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Ynez-Arancibia.

Copyright 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved

~

FIGURE 11.5 (a) Historical patterns in phenology of A. tonsa and M. leidyi at central estuary stations in Narragansett Bay, USA. Linear regression indicates that A. tonsa phenology has not shown significant alteration (p = 0.195) during the period from 1950 to 2003. In contrast, the first appearance of M. leidyi has shifted significantly (p = 0.006) earlier in the year during the same period. (b) Decline in maximum seasonal concentrations of the copepod A. tonsa in the Narragansett Bay estuary during the period 20002003 (n = 4) relative to years between 1951 and 1983 (n = 7). All data collected from the same site; historical data (pre-2000) assembled from a variety of sources. Error bars represent standard error of the mean and, although not shown, negative bars are symmetrical with positive bars. Average values for the two time periods are significantly different (Mann Whitney, p = 0.008). Source: From Costello et al. (2006).

ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Ynez-Arancibia.

Copyright 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved

~

FIGURE 11.6 Examples of phytoplankton and microzooplankton from Louisiana estuaries imaged with a color FlowCAM. Most particles were imaged at 10 or 20 magnification.

ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Ynez-Arancibia.

Copyright 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved

~

FIGURE 11.7 (a) An estuarine plankton sample from Louisiana digitized with a Zooscan. (b)Magnified vignettes of different organisms (A, chaetognath; B, crab megalopa; C, decapods; D, doliolid; E, calanoid copepod; F, fish larva).

ESTUARINE ECOLOGY, Second Edition. John W. Day JR, Byron C. Crump, W. Michael Kemp, and Alejandro Ynez-Arancibia.

Copyright 2013 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved

~