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DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY DESCRIPTION OF COURSES - ACADEMIC YEAR 2008-2009 WINTER SEMESTER DIVISION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES Course title: Αncient Greek (I) Name of lecturer: D. Spatharas, K. Spanoudakis Course code: AEFF 010 Type of course: Exercise Level of course: Introductory Year of study: 1/2 Semester/trimester: Winter Number of credits: 4 Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): The course aims at a) extending the students' knowledge of the morphology and syntax of Ancient Greek (Attic prose), b) improving their reading skills, and c) developing their skill in Greek prose composition. Prerequisites: none Course contents: Reading and translation of Attic prose; grammar and syntax; particular focus on and thorough practice in the following phenomena: a. the use of the cases; b. the use of the moods in principal clauses; c. the use of the tenses; d. the infinitive; e. the participle. Particular emphasis will also be placed upon accentuation, vowel and consonant change, the declension of nouns and the conjugation of verbs. Recommended reading: D. A. Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose, Oxford 1991. L. R. PALMER, The Greek Language, London 1980. E. SCHWYZER, Griechische Grammatik I-IV, München 1939-71 [I: Lautlehre, II: Syntax und syntaktische Stilistik (suppl. A. DEBRUNNER), III: Register, IV: Stellenregister]. H.W. SMYTH, Greek Grammar (revised by G.M. MESSING), Cambridge Mass. 1956. Teaching methods: Expository teaching and questioning; discourse; ad hoc exercises; written assignments. Assessment methods: Written examination Language of instruction: Modern Greek Course title: Introduction to Classical Philology Name of lecturer: Anastasios Nikolaidis Course code: AEFF 100 Type of course: Lecture Level of course: Intermediate Year of study: 1/ 2 Semester: Winter Number of credits: 6 Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Introduction to the object, methods, history of Philology and familiarization with the tools of philological research.

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DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES - ACADEMIC YEAR 2008-2009

WINTER SEMESTER

DIVISION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES

Course title: ncient Greek (I)

Name of lecturer: D. Spatharas, K. Spanoudakis

Course code: AEFF 010

Type of course: Exercise

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/2

Semester/trimester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The course aims at a) extending the students' knowledge of the morphology and syntax of Ancient Greek (Attic prose), b) improving their reading skills, and c) developing their skill in Greek prose composition.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Reading and translation of Attic prose; grammar and syntax; particular focus on and thorough practice in the following phenomena: a. the use of the cases; b. the use of the moods in principal clauses; c. the use of the tenses; d. the infinitive; e. the participle. Particular emphasis will also be placed upon accentuation, vowel and consonant change, the declension of nouns and the conjugation of verbs.

Recommended reading:

D. A. Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose, Oxford 1991.

L. R. PALMER, The Greek Language, London 1980.

E. SCHWYZER, Griechische Grammatik I-IV, Mnchen 1939-71 [I: Lautlehre, II: Syntax und

syntaktische Stilistik (suppl. A. DEBRUNNER), III: Register, IV: Stellenregister].

H.W. SMYTH, Greek Grammar (revised by G.M. MESSING), Cambridge Mass. 1956.

Teaching methods: Expository teaching and questioning; discourse; ad hoc exercises; written assignments.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Introduction to Classical Philology

Name of lecturer: Anastasios Nikolaidis

Course code: AEFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 1/ 2

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 6

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Introduction to the object, methods, history of Philology and familiarization with the tools of philological research.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: Object, methods and tools of philology. Survey of the history of classical philology (esp. Greek) from the Hellenistic era to the middle of the 20th century. Open philological questions and modern approaches.

Recommended reading:

Irigoin, Jean, Tradition et Critique des Textes Grecs, Paris 1997.

Jger, Gerhard, Einfhrung in die klassische Philologie, Mnchen 21980.

Maas, Paul, Textkritik, Leipzig 31957 (1927).

Mioni, Elpidio, Introduzione alla Paleografia Greca, Padova1973.

Nesselrath, Heinz-Gnther, Einleitung in die griechische Philologie, Stuttgart- Leipzig 1997.

Pfeiffer, Rudolf, History of Classical Scholarship, 2 vols., Oxford 1968/1976.

Reynolds, L.D. Wilson, N.G., Scribes and Scholars. A Guide to the Transmission of Greek and Latin Literature, London 21975 (1967).

Turner, E. G., Greek Papyri. An Introduction, Oxford 1968.

Van Groningen, B. A., Trait d' histoire et de critique des textes grecs, Amsterdam 1963.

West, M. L., Textual Criticism and Editorial Technique, Stuttgart 1973.

Teaching methods: Lecture/Discussion

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Homer, Iliad

Name of lecturer: Athena Kavoulaki

Course code: AEFF ???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of students with the language, composition and structures of Homeric poetry, and especially of the Iliad. Understanding of the wider cultural context of traditional epic poetry.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: This is a text-based subject. The primary aim is to read and discuss a wide selection of passages from the Iliad from many different angles (language, style, compositional techniques etc.), as well as to highlight the wider context of Archaic epic poetry.

Recommended reading:

G.S. Kirk et al., eds., The Iliad: A Commentary, vols. I-VI, Cambridge 1985-91.

M.D. Edwards, , I, . . B. , N. M, A: K, 2001.

R. Fowler (.), The Cambridge Companion to Homer, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Greek elegy and iambus

Name of lecturer: Dimos Spatharas

Course code: AEFF ???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Introduce students to Lyric poetry and present the main features of Greek elegy and iambus. Familiarization of students with the language, composition and structure of selected poems.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: The primary aim of the course is to offer a close reading of selected elegiac and iambic poetry. We shall discuss matters of language, style, and interpretation, while special emphasis will be placed on the performative context(s) of the poems under study.

Recommended reading:

. L. West, Delectus ex iambis et elegis graecis (Oxford, 1980).

D. E. Gerber (ed.), A Companion to the Greek Lyric Poets (Leiden, 1997).

, . , .1 (, 1981)

Teaching methods: Lecture and discussion.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Euripides Ion

Name of lecturer: Lucia Athanassaki

Course code: AEFF ???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Acquisition of linguistic skills (morphology, syntax & vocabulary) and development of critical interpretive abilities.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

Reading and interpretation of Euripides' Ion with emphasis on the political objectives of the play in the light of the sociohistorical context the composition and performance.

Recommended reading: For the study of the play the commentaries of Owen and Lee and the recent monograph of K. Zacharia, Converging Truths, are recommended. For Greek drama in general students are encouraged to read one of the three works that have been recommended for distribution (Easterling, Lesky, Markantonatos-Tsagalis).

Teaching methods: Lecture combined with class discussion.

Assessment methods: Final written exam

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Gods in epic and dramatic poetry (of the archaic and classical times)

Name of lecturer: Athena Kavoulaki

Course code: AEFF ???

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

understanding of Greek poetry and poetics; acquisition of special research skills in the field of Archaic and Classical Poetry and familiarization with special research methodology (use of bibliography, data bases etc); practice in oral and written presentation of scholarly problems.

Prerequisites: Greek Reading and Prose Class; Introduction to Classical Philology

Course contents: The role of the gods is an issue of central importance for the understanding of ancient Greek poetics. This seminar aims at examining some basic ways in which the gods function in Archaic and Classical Greek poetry and more particularly the hierarchical relationships they are presented to form with mortals. After an introductory presentation, a tentative list of topics and readings will be given and students must work on and report on their projects several times during the course of the seminar.

Recommended reading:

Burkert, W., A E : A , A: K 1993.

D. Feeney, The gods in epic, Oxford 1991.

. Kearns, The gods in the Homeric Epics, R. Fowler (.), The Cambridge Companion

to Homer, Cambridge 2004.

Lefkowitz, M., A, . A. M, A: M, 2003.

Seaford R., . -, .: . , , , 2003.

C. Sourvinou-Inwood, Tragedy and Athenian Religion, Lanham & London 2003.

Vernant, J-P & P. Vidal-Naquet, M E, . A-B, A: Z, 1988-1991.

Vernant, J.-P., M E, A 2000.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written essay.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Ancient Greek Epigram

Name of lecturer: onstantinos Spanoudakis

Course code: FF 327

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The aim of the seminar is to render students familiar with the forms and kinds of Greek epigram as well as with its historical evolution. Also to make them acquire experience in handling a bibliography and composing an independent scientific essay.

Prerequisites: AEFF 100 and AEFF 010 or AEFF 020.

Course contents: The literary and social background leading to the genesis and evolution of the Greek epigram will be discussed in the Seminar. Texts will include a wide range of authors and poems from the first specimens to Palladas.

Recommended reading:

. , , , 1999.

. , : . : . & . (.), . , 2008, 325-416.

Teaching methods: Lecture, oral presentation, discussion

Assessment methods: Oral presentation, written essay

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Latin Reading and Prose Class I

Name of lecturer: to be announced

Course code: LAFF 010

Type of course: Exercise

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/ 2

Semester/trimester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The course aims a) at extending the students knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language, b) at improving their reading skills, and c) at developing their skill in Latin composition.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Use of the cases, infinitive, participle, supine, gerund and gerundive; tenses, moods, consecutio temporum. Latin prose composition. Selected Latin prose authors.

Recommended reading:

. , , 1979.

.. , , 1979.

Teaching methods: Exercises and lectures

Assessment methods: Participation in class and written exams

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Lucretius, De rerum natura.

Name of lecturer: Anastasios Nikolaidis

Course code: LAFF 101

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Emphasis on Lucretius' art by which Epicurus' prosaic ontology is transformed into lofty poetry. Familiarization with the picurean philosophy as well as with the Roman didactic poetry.

Prerequisites: LAFF 010 and LAFF 100 (desirably, not necessarily)

Course contents: After a brief survey of the classical didactic poetry, we will focus on Lucretius' poetical art, trying to understand how an essentially technical work, as Epicurus On Nature, is recast and transformed into the brilliant poetry of the De rerum natura. We will examine and discuss extensive portions from primarily books I, III, and V.

Recommended reading:

Brown, P. M., Lucretius, De rerum natura I, Bristol 1984.

Costa, C.D.N., Lucretius, De rerum natura V, Oxford 1984.

Kenney, E. J., Lucretius, De rerum natura III, Cambridge 1971.

Von Albrecht, Michael, Geschichte der rmischen Literatur I, Mnchen 21994, Chapter II.2.C.

Teaching methods: Lecture/Discussion

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Seneca, Apocolocyntosis

Name of lecturer: Stelios Panayotakis

Course code: LAFF 252

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the genre of Menippean Satire and its manifestation in Latin literature; improved understanding of issues of style and intertextuality in Seneca.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

Critical discussion of Senecas satire; special emphasis will be given to character portrayal, the use of literary models, and literary technique. The evaluation of Senecas work and ideology against both the literary and the historical background will receive particular attention.

Recommended reading:

Seneca, Apocolocyntosis, ed. P.T. Eden, Cambridge 1984.

Seneca, Apocolocyntosis Divi Claudii, hrgs., uebers. comm. A.A. Lund, Heidelberg 1994.

J. Adamietz, Senecas Apocolocyntosis in idem (ed.), Die rmische Satire, Darmstadt 1986, 356-82.

Teaching methods: Lectures, class participation and discussion

Assessment methods: Written exam

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Apuleius, Cupid and Psyche

Name of lecturer: Stelios Panayotakis

Course code: LAFF???

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd, 4th

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the genre, the dramatic function and the narrative use of the inserted tale in the Roman novel, and illustration of the survival of the ancient myth in modern literature and art. Acquisition of special research skills and familiarization with special research methodology.

Prerequisites: LAFF 100, LAFF 010 or 020

Course contents:

The seminar aims at examining the structure, the content and the narrative function of the inserted tale of Cupid and Psyche (Apuleius, Metamorphoseis 4.28-6.24); particular emphasis will be given to the study of possible sources and models of the tale, such as ancient myth and folklore, Hellenistic literature, Platonic philosophy, iconography. It will also be of interest to illustrate the survival of the Latin tale in modern Greek folklore.

Recommended reading:

P.G. Walsh, , : 2000.

Apuleius, Cupid and Psyche, edited by E.J. Kenney, Cambridge 1990.

G. Binder & R. Merkelbach (ed.), Amor und Psyche, Darmstadt 1968.

M. Zimmerman et al. (ed.), Aspects of Apuleius Golden Ass vol. II: Cupid and Psyche, Groningen 1998.

Teaching methods: Basic introduction given by the instructor and students participation and presentation of selected topics.

Assessment methods: class participation, oral presentation and written essay.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

DIVISION OF BYZANTINE AND MODERN GREEK PHILOLOGY

Course title: Introduction to Byzantine Literature

Name of lecturer: Ioannis Vassis

Course code: BYFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/2

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the subject

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: The course is intended for first-year students and includes: a short history of Byzantine studies; introduction to the use of basic handbooks, dictionaries and journals; an account of the literary genres which were cultivated in Byzantium; reading of and commenting on selected passages.

Recommended reading:

H. Hunger, , . -, 1991-1992.

J. O. Rosenqvist, , 2008.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Biography in the early Byzantine period: from the Lives of Sophists to the monastic Biography

Name of lecturer: Marina Detoraki

Course code: BYFF 131

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of students with the rules of Biography as a literary genre; examination of the innovative aspects of monastic Biography vis--vis the Neo-Platonic Lives; analysis of the monastic biography.

Prerequisites: BYFF 100 (desirable, not necessary).

Course contents: This is a text-based subject. The primary aim is to read passages from the Lives of philosophers by Eunapius and to discuss their differences from the first monastic Life, that of Antonius. An introduction to the literature of the early byzantine period and especially to the beginnings of byzantine hagiography will provide the courses background.

Recommended reading:

1) , [B ], : , . .

2) , : Athanase dAlexandrie Vie dAntoine, . G. J. M. Bartelink, : Sources Chrtiennes 400, : Les ditions du Cerf, Paris 1994.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The capture of Thessalonica: Ioannis Kaminiates (10th cent.) - Eustathios of Thessalonica (12th cent.)

Name of lecturer: Marina Loukaki

Course code: BYFF 165

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

1. Familiarization with the language of the specific authors 2. Learning of the historical background 3. Familiarization with the literary approach of byzantine historical texts.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: After the examination of the historical events concerning the capture of Thessalonica by the Arabs in 904 and by the Normands in 1185, we shall study the literary approach of the same subject by two different authors.

Recommended reading:

, , , 2000.

St. Kyriakides, Eustazio di Tessalonica. La espugnazione di Tessalonica, Palermo 1961.

. , . , . , , 32, 2002.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: he Encyclopedism of Constantine VII Porphyrogennitos

Name of lecturer: Manolis Patedakis

Course code: FF 272

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Discussion on the term Encyclopedism during this period. Introduction to texts transmitted under the name of the emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogennitos. Understanding of the character of specific works.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: We will examine works such as De Thematibus, De Cerimoniis, De Administrando Imperio. We will read and analyze selected passages. These works will be seen as individual texts conceived in a certain cultural context and composed possibly under a common project; however, they obtain separate features in their structure, style and content.

Recommended reading:

P. Lemerle, : 10 , tr. -, thens: 1985.

A. Toynbee, Constantine Porphyrogenitus and his world, London-New York-Toronto 1973.

Teaching methods: Lecturing on particular units under the general plan of the subject. Handouts with all relevant passages as well as virtual effects will support each lecture.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: George Pachymeres,

Name of lecturer: Manolis Patedakis

Course code: BYFF 328

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3 / 4

Semester: Fall

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Research on the work of a major historian of the Early Palaeologan Period. Discussion on the general features of historical writing as well as on specific issues regarding the composition technique, structure and content.

Prerequisites: BYFF 100, AEFF 010 or 020; the successful participation in a course BYFF on Byzantine historiography-chronography is desirable.

Course contents: Students will become familiar with bibliography relevant to introductory issues (the author Pachymeres, features of historical writing) as well as specific subjects which they will undertake as a field work. George Pachymeres composed his historical work that narrates events from a particular period of time (1260-1308). The agreement with terms from the historical genre of the period, the view and tools of the historian, issues relevant to language and structure, the relation with the rest of works written by Pachymeres, as well as the relation between the two preserved versions of his historical work will be among the subjects under research.

Recommended reading:

. , , - , thens 2004

Georges Pachymrs, Relations Historiques, (ed. tr.) A. Failler - (tr.) V. Laurent, CFHB 24/1-5, Paris 1984-2000

La version brve des Relations Historiques de Georges Pachymrs, (ed.) A. Failler, Archives de l orient chrtien 17-19, Paris: Institut Francais d tudes Byzantines 2001-2004

Teaching methods: Introduction, comments on presentations, discussion.

Assessment methods: Oral presentation and performance, written essay.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek.

Course title: Ekphrasis of cities: Literature and Historical Reality

Name of lecturer: Marina Loukaki

Course code: BYFF 340

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization of the students (3rd and 4th year) with special research methodology. Practice in oral and written presentation of scholarly problems. Discussion on the relation between literature and historical reality in Byzantine texts.

Prerequisites: BYFF 100, AEFF 010 and 020.

Course contents: Study of the general rules for the composition of a praise of a city proposed by the rhetoricians of Late Antiquity. Study of various byzantine descriptions of cities, such as those of Antioch, Nikaia, Corinthos, Trebizond, etc.

Recommended reading:

H. Hunger, , . 1, 19912, 264-272.

, , . D.A. Russel - N.G. Wilson, Menander Rhetor, Oxford 1981, 28-74.

, , ,

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written essay.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Byzantine ekphrasis on works of art

Name of lecturer: Ioannis Vassis

Course code: BYFF 341

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Understanding of Byzantine poetry and poetics; acquisition of special research skills in the fields of Byzantine secular poetry and rhetorical theory; familiarization with special research methodology (use of bibliography, data bases etc.); practice in oral and written presentation of scholarly problems.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Byzantine Philology; Greek Reading and Prose Class

Course contents: Description of works of art as a rhetorical genre in the Byzantine era: Tradition and originality. Representative texts in verse chosen from the literary production of eleven centuries: Paul the Silentiary, Constantine the Rhodian, Manuel Philes etc.

Recommended reading:

. -M. Hinterberger, , 2006

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Books of popular literature in the 16th and 17th centuries

Name of lecturer: Stephanos Kaklamanis

Course code: NEFF 126

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of students with the language and literature of the 16th and 17th centuries.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: The role of printing in the diffusion of the written culture and the formation of the reading public. Books of popular literature in the 16th century: authors, printers, editors, readers. The formation of the first printed corpus of modern Greek literature and its evolution. The reception of the chapbooks.

Analysis of selected passages from the following works: Apollonius, Anthos Chariton, Theseis, Chapbook of Donkey, King of Scotland, Bertoldos etc.

Recommended reading:

Giulio Cesare Dalla Croce, , , 1988.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Name of lecturer: Alexis Politis

Course code: NEFF 159

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the subject.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Examination of the poetic works by Solomos (with the exceptions of Dialogos, and The Woman of Zacynthos). The poems will be presented in chronological order and themes and motives will be analyzed; for this purpose both the contemporary literary production and the poets own personality and experiences will be taken into account. The particular feature of Solomos poetry, namely the incomplete state of the majority of the poems, and the reception of Solomos in modern Greek society will also receive special attention.

Recommended reading: , , , ed. , thens 1948 (and reprints) , , ed.-intr. , Athens 1994, 22007.

Teaching methods: lecturing, analysis of poetic texts

Assessment methods: written/oral examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: E. Roides

Name of lecturer: D. Polychronakis.

Course code: NEFF ???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the literary work of E. Roides and the genre of satire

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: The aim of this lecture is to analyze the satirical art of Roides both in his novel Pope Joan and in his short stories. The lecture includes discussion on some of Roides theoretical texts about aesthetics and language.

Recommended reading:

. , . . , .

. , . .

. , . . .

. , . . .

Teaching methods: Lecturing and discussion.

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Ulysses and Penelope in Greek and European Literature of the 20th century

Name of lecturer: Angela Kastrinaki

Course code: NEFF ???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with important texts of the 20th century and with Intertextuality.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents:

Analysis of twentieth century European novels and poems, in which the Odyssean couple plays the principal role. Actually these texts shed new light into family relations during a century in which the notion of family has been much disputed.

Recommended reading:

W. B. Stanford, The Ulysses Theme, 21968

, 20 , 20 , , , , 2003

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The fall of Constantinople in the Post-Byzantine literature (1453-18th cent.)

Name of lecturer: Stephanos Kaklamanis

Course code: NEFF ???

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Understanding of modern Greek poetry and poetics; acquisition of special research skills in the field of modern Greek literature and familiarization with special research methodology (use of bibliography, data bases etc); practice in oral and written presentation of scholarly problems.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Modern Greek Literature

Course contents: The aim of the seminar is, on the one hand, to examine the literary texts of the period of the Ottoman rule that refer to the fall of Constantinople by the Turks (1453) and, on the other, to demonstrate the literary modes (themes, topoi, motives, modes of expression, narrative technique, versification etc.) and their ideological status.

Recommended reading:

, , 1994.

1453. , , 2005.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Book review workshop

Name of lecturer: Angela Kastrinaki

Course code: NEFF ???

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd, 4th

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Developing ability in aesthetic judgment

Prerequisites: NEFF 100 and 2 NEFF courses

Course contents: Familiarization with the book reviews published in newspapers. Exercise in expressing aesthetic judgments. Composition of three book reviews, namely of a novel, a short story and an essay; the reviews should be of a satisfactory level, and will accordingly be placed on our blog.

Recommended reading: Book reviews in newspapers.

Teaching methods: reading together reviews, commenting on students reviews

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written essay

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

DIVISION OF LINGUISTICS

Course title: Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics

Name of lecturer: Alexis Kalokerinos

Course code: GLOF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/2

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the subject

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

This course serves as a general introduction to Theoretical Linguistics and is mainly aimed at students encountering the scientific study of language for the first time. The first three lectures cover basic issues which have given rise to widespread misunderstandings, all of are concerned with the nature of language. The following lectures provide an introductory overview of the main fields of Theoretical Linguistics, i.e. Phonetics and Phonology, Morphology, Syntax (with an emphasis on Generative Grammar), Semantics and Pragmatics.

Recommended reading: Pinker, Steven 1995. The Language Instinct. New York: Perennial (HarperCollins) , .-. 1999. , , . :

, 2003. .

Warburton, 1992. . :

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Introduction to the history of Greek language

Name of lecturer: Dimitra Delli

Course code: GLOF 102

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/2 /3

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course:

Familiarization with the history of Greek language

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

This introductory course surveys the main stages through which Greek has evolved as a member of the indo-european family. The main changes in phonology, morphology, vocabulary, writing system, dialect diversification marking the transition from one stage to the next in the history of Greek will be presented and explained. The presentation will also be preceded by a brief account of the principles of comparative-historical methodology.

Recommended reading:

Brownig, R., 1969. Medieval and Modern Greek. . . . , . . : . , 1988.

Colvin, S. 2007. A Historical Greek Reader. Mycenaean to the Koin. Oxford: University Press.

HOFFMANN A., A. Debrunner & A. Scherrer 1969. Geschichte der griechischen Sprache, I-II. . . . , , : , 1983.

Horrocks, G. 1997. Greek: A History of the Language and its Speakers. . . . & . . . : , 2006.

MACKRIDGE, P. 1985. The modern greek language. . . . . , . : . , 1987.

TONNET, H. 1993. Histoire du grec moderne. La formation d'une langue. . . . & . , . . , . . : . , 1995.

, . . (.), 1999. . : ....

, . 20025. . .

, .-. (.). 2001. . . : . [ ].

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Generative Transformational Grammar- Syntax II

Name of lecturer: Elena Anagnostopoulou

Course code: GLOF 111

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate/Advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarize the students with the basic methods and objectives of Theoretical Syntax. This is a compulsory course of the Division of Linguistics

Prerequisites: Syntax I

Course contents:

The class will focus on (i) A-movement (passives, raising, unaccusatives), (ii) clause structure, functional heads and head movement, (iii) Case theory and (iv) The Minimal Link Condition

Recommended reading:

Baltin, Mark. 2003. A-Movement In Mark Baltin and Chris Collins, eds. The Handbook of Contemporary Syntactic Theory. Oxford:Blackwell.

Haegeman, L. To appear. Thinking Syntactically. Ms. University Lille3.

Haegeman, L. 1994. Introduction to Government and Binding Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Johnson, Kyle. 2002. Introduction to Transformational Grammar. Ms. University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Lasnik, H. and J. Uriagereka. 1988. A Course in GB Syntax. Lectures on Binding and Empty Categories. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Ouhalla, J. 1999. Introducing Transformational Grammar. From Principles and Parameters to Minimalism. London: Arnold publishers.

Radford, A. 1988. Transformational Grammar. A First Course. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Radford, A. 1997. Syntax. A minimalist introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Riemsdijk, H. and E. Williams. 1986. Introduction to the Theory of Grammar. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Spencer, A. 1991. Morphological Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Webelhuth, G., ed. 1995. Government & Binding Theory and the Minimalist Program. Oxford: Blackwell.

Teaching methods: Lecture

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The ancient Greek dialects in literature

Name of lecturer: Dimitra Delli

Course code: GLOF 306

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester/trimester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the linguistic analysis of texts of ancient Greek language.

Prerequisites: GLOF 100

Course contents:

In this seminar, we will study the artistic use of ancient Greek language in literature. Specifically, we will examine the following literary forms: epic/lyric poetry, attic tragedy, ionian and attic prose, comedy.

Recommended reading:

BUCK C. D., 1955. The Greek Dialects. Grammar, selected inscriptions, glossary. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Colvin, S. 2007. A Historical Greek Reader. Mycenaean to the Koin. Oxford: University Press.

HOFFMANN A., A. Debrunner & A. Scherrer 1969. Geschichte der griechischen Sprache, I-II. . . . , , : , 1983.

Morpurgo Davis, A. 1987. The Greek notion of dialect. Verbum X : 7-27.

nesselrath h.g., 1997. . . . . . . , . , . , . , . . : , 2001.

sad s., m. trd & a. boullyec, 1997. . . . . , . . : , 2001. . 1 2001 / .2 2004.

, 2000. : / .

, .-. (.). 2001. . . : . [ ].

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Issues in Morphosyntax

Name of lecturer: Elena Anagnostopoulou

Course code: GLOF 357

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Intermediate/Advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

To familiarize the students with the interface between morphology and syntax

Prerequisites: Syntax I

Course contents:

The Seminar examines problems in the interface between morphology and syntax with a special focus on Greek. The topics that will be discussed include nominalizations, compounding, incorporation, inflection, clitics, the relationship between morphological and syntactic Voice, participles and verbal adjectives.

Recommended reading:

. (2001) . : . .

. (2006) . : . .

Alexiadou, A. 2001. Functional Structure in Nominals. Nominalization and ergativity. Amsterdam / Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Alexiadou, A., E. Anagnostopoulou & M. Everaert. 2004. The Unaccusativity Puzzle. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Baker, M. 1988. Incorporation: a Theory of Grammatical Function Changing. Chicago, Illinois: The University of Chicago Press.

Bonet, E. 1991. Morphology after Syntax: Pronominal Clitics in Romance Languages. Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Linguistics and Philosophy, MIT.

Embick, D. 1997. Voice and the Interfaces of Syntax. Ph.D dissertation, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania.

Grimshaw, J. 1990. Argument Structure. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Halle, M. and A. Marantz. 1993. Distributed Morphology and the Pieces of Inflection. In: Kenneth Hale and Samuel Jay Keyser (eds.), The View from Building 20: 111-176. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Kratzer, A. 1994. On External Arguments. In: Elena Benedicto and Jeff Runner (eds.), Functional Projections, 103-130. Amherst: GLSA.

Lieber, R.1983. Argument Linking and Compounds in English. Linguistic Inquiry 14. 251-285.

Marantz A. 1997. No escape from syntax: Dont try morphological analysis in the privacy of your own lexicon. Paper prsented at the 21st Penn Linguistics Colloquium. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, 4.2. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania.

Markantonatou, S. 1992. The Syntax of Modern Greek Noun Phrases with a derived nominal head. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Essex.

Spencer, A. 1991. Morphological Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Williams, E. 1981. Argument Structure and Morphology. The Linguistic Review 1: 81-114.

Teaching methods: Seminar (lecture, discussion, oral presentations)

Assessment methods: Written paper (after oral presentation)

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

DIVISION OF THEATRE STUDIES AND MUSICOLOGY

Course title: History of theatre in Europe (From the Medieval times up to Enlightenment)

Name of lecturer: Manolis Siragakis

Course code: THNEF ???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: Any

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course:

Familiarization of students to the development of theatre in Europe, the different periods, the main authors and plays.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The main phases of European theatre and its variety as it appeared among different countries. Plays' texts in combination with discussion about the social condition and the theatre activity will provide a view of this period.

Recommended reading:

Vito Pandolfi, Storia Universale del Teatro Dramatico, Torino, 1964

Leon Moussinac, Le thtre des origines a nos jours, Paris, 1966 (2nd edition)

Allardyce Nicoll, The Development of the Theatre, London, 1966 (5th edition)

Allardyce Nicoll, World Drama, London, 1976.

Heinz Kindermann,Theatergeschichte Europas, b.1-10, Salzburg, 1957-1974.

Oscar Brockett, History of the Theatre, Allyn & Bacon, Boston, 2003 (9th edition)

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The Romantic Movement in European and Modern Greek Theatre

Name of lecturer: Antonis Glytzouris

Course code: THNEF ???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 1/ 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of students with the Romantic movement, understanding of the plays of the era.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: The emergence of Romanticism and the European theatre, the main features and an outline of the Romantic Movement in German, English, Russian and French theatre. The reception of Romanticism in Modern Greek Theatre from 1830s up to Neo-Romanticism, its relations with Enlightenment and Classicism. The course will put emphasis on top European and Greek romantic dramas of Schiller, Kleist, Griboyedov, Hugo, P. Soutsos, A. R. Rangabes, D. Vernardakis, Sp. Vasileiadis.

Recommended reading:

B. V. Daniels, Revolution in the Theatre: French Romantic Theories of Drama, Greenwood Press, Westport CT, 1983

. . , , , , 1982,

. , : 1830-1880, .... , , 1993.

. , , . - . (.), . , University Studio Press, , 2002, . 165-226.

. , , . : , , , 2002, . 192-229.

. , , , , -, . 3, Ergo, , 2004, . 59-68.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; discourse

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Modern-Greek theatre during the 1940 decade

Name of lecturer: Manolis Siragakis

Course code: THNEF ???

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course:

Mainly, familiarization with special research methodology (use of bibliography, data bases etc); practice in oral and written presentation of scholarly problems.

Prerequisites:

Any Modern-Greek Theatre Class. The Interwar Period Class would be preferred.

Course contents (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

After an introductory presentation, a tentative list of topics and readings will be given and students must work on and report on their projects several times during the course of the seminar. These topics will be on the period of 1940-1950, according to Musical Theatre during this decade, Laws about theatre, The life of certain theatre groups, their repertoire, the National Theatre, the theatre life in small provincial towns in Crete for example, etc.

Recommended reading:

Kalaitzi Glykeria, Modern-Greek theatre during the 1940s decade, Doctorate, Thessaloniki.

Kagelari D.,Greek Stage from 1940 to 1953, in Christos Chadjiiosif, History of Greece during 20th century, volume 2, Vivliorama, 2007, p. 335-361

Machairas Evangelos, Art during Greek Resistance, Athens, Kastaniotis, 1999, p. 105-168 (all in Greek language)

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: European Film Movements I. German Expressionism, Soviet Montage, French Poetic Realism

Name of lecturer: Panayiota Mini

Course code: KPAF 158

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 1/2/3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with three major European film movements of the 1920s and 1930sGerman Expressionism, Soviet Montage, French Poetic Realism. Familiarization with representative films and filmmakers and with the film movements relations to the artistic and historical contexts of the time.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: The lecture will examine three of the most important film movements of the pre-World War II era: German Expressionism, Soviet Montage, and French Poetic Realism. We will discuss the artistic and historical contexts within which the movements appeared, will study major films and their techniques, and will examine the work of representative filmmakers (e.g., Lang, Murnau, Eisenstein, Vertov, Carne, Renoir.)

Recommended reading:

1. Lotte Eisner, Fritz Lang, Da Capo Paperback, 1986.

2. Jay Leyda, Kino, History of the Russian and Soviet Film, Allen & U.

3. Christopher Faulkner, The Social Cinema of Jean Renoir, Princeton University Press, 1992.

Teaching methods: Lecture, class discussion, visual aids, film screenings.

Assessment methods: Written Examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES - ACADEMIC YEAR 2008-2009

SPRING SEMESTER

DIVISION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES

Course title: Greek Reading and Prose Class: Part II

Name of lecturer: N. Litinas

Course code: AEFF 020

Type of course: Exercise

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): The course aims a) at extending the students' knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Ancient Greek language (Attic dialect), b) at improving their reading skills, and c) at developing their skill in Greek prose composition.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: The aims and format are the same as in Part I but this time the syntax of the complex sentence will be the primary object of study. More particularly, the syntactical topics to be covered are: 1. coordination and subordination; 2. subordinate clauses: a. object, b. purpose, c. causal, d. result, e. conditional, f. concessive, g. temporal, h. relative and comparative, i. clauses after verbs of fearing and precaution; 3. interrogative and exclamatory sentences; 4. direct and indirect speech; simple and complex sentences in indirect discourse. Apart from syntax, accentuation, etymology and aspects of historical grammar will also receive particular attention during the course. Practice in Greek prose composition will include larger and more complicated texts. As in Part I, four texts (different from those of Part I) will be prescribed for individual reading. An extract of about ten lines will be dictated during exams for correct spelling and translation. Other exercises will also be included in the exam paper.

Recommended reading:

D. A. Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose, Oxford 1991;

L. R. PALMER, The Greek Language, London 1980.

E. SCHWYZER, Griechische Grammatik I-IV, Mnchen 1939-71 [I: Lautlehre, II: Syntax und

syntaktische Stilistik (suppl. A. DEBRUNNER), III: Register, IV: Stellenregister].

H.W. SMYTH, Greek Grammar (revised by G.M. MESSING), Cambridge Mass. 1956.

Teaching methods: Exercises and lectures

Assessment methods: Participation in class and written exams

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Advanced Exercise on Greek Prose

Name of lecturer: onstantinos Spanoudakis

Course code: FF 040

Type of course: Exercise

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The aim of the lecture is to render students familiar with the diachrony of Greek prose writing and to make them enjoy Greek prose beyond the trouble of having to attach tags on every word.

Prerequisites: Successful participation in AEFF 10 and AEFF 20 is absolutely desirable

Course contents: In the theoretic part of the course subjects not taught in AEFF 010 or 020 will be treated, including the uses of tempora, of particles, the basic figures of speech, the article. In the practical part there will be an approach, in terms of style and interpretation, of a wide range of texts, pagan and Christian, from the first appearance of Greek prose to the early Byzantine period. The course is particularly suitable for those who have acquired good familiarity with Greek, and in the future plan to take part in the ASEP exams or teach Greek.

Recommended reading:

J. D. Denniston, Greek Prose Style, 1952.

D. A. Russell. An Anthology of Greek Prose, 1991.

. , ., , 3 ., 2001.

Teaching methods: Lecture

Assessment methods: Written exam

Course title: Apollonius Rhodius

Name of lecturer: onstantinos Spanoudakis

Course code: FF 106

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate/Advanced

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

The aim of the lecture is to render students familiar with epic language, the neoteric movement of Alexandria and its literary and cultural ambience.

Prerequisites: none (successful participation in AEFF 010 is desirable)

Course contents: Episodes from all books of the Argonautica will be taught. Other than elucidating the text line to line, the approach will include discussion about literary and cultural environment as well as of the salient neoteric features of the epic: the alternative heroic model, humour poetique, psychological fluctuation of the characters, the love-theme, the scheming god, magic as a means of supernatural manipulation of behaviour.

Recommended reading:

R. Hunter, Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica Book III, Cambridge 1989.

R. Hunter . Fantuzzi &, O , 2004, 162-225.

Teaching methods: Lecture, discussion

Assessment methods: written exam

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Euripides, Medea.

Name of lecturer: Anastasios Nikolaidis

Course code: AEFF 148

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Birth and development of tragedy, the novelties of Euripides dramatic art, decoding Medeas message. The students are expected to acquire the knowledge and skill, on the one hand, to discern the novelties introduced by Euripides and, on the other, to trace the multiple and at many levels messages of tragic poetry in general and of Medea in particular.

Prerequisites: AFF 010 and AFF 100 (desirably, not necessarily)

Course contents: After a historical introduction to tragedy (birth and development of the genre) and Euripides (the emphasis on the novelties of his art), we shall focus on Medea in an attempt to understand how a barbarian mythical figure came to emblematize, on the one hand, the most heinous criminal act (infanticide) and, on the other, the feminist cause for womans social manumission.

Recommended reading:

Lesky, Albin, Die tragische Dichtung der Hellenen, Gttingen 31972 (1956) The book has also been translated into English.

Mastronarde, D. J., Euripides, Medea, Cambridge 2002

Page, D. L. Euripides, Medea, Oxford 1938

Pickard-Cambridge, Arthur Webster T.B.L., Dithyramb, Tyragedy and Comedy, Oxford 21962 (1927).

Romilly, Jacquelline de, La tragedie grecque, Paris1970.

Romilly, Jacquelline de, La modernit d Euripide, Paris1986.

Taplin, Oliver, Greek Tragedy in Action, London 21985 (1978).

Teaching methods: Lecture/Discussion

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Aristophanes, Clouds

Name of lecturer: Dimos Spatharas

Course code: AEFF 169

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Introduce students to Aristophanes Comedy and present the main features of the genre. Linguistic analysis and interpretation of the play and discussion of the main features of the sophistic movement.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: This is a text-based subject. The primary aim of the course is to offer a close reading of the play. We shall discuss matters of language, style, and interpretation, while special emphasis will be placed on the comic techniques employed by Aristophanes.

Recommended reading:

Dover, K. Aristophanes, Clouds (Oxford, 1968)

O'Regan, D. E. Rhetoric, Comedy and the Violence of Language in Aristophanes' Clouds (Oxford, 1992)

Sommerstein, A. Aristphanes, Clouds (Warminster, 1982)

Zimmermann, B. H (, 2002)

Teaching methods: Lecture and discussion.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Platonic Prosopography

Name of lecturer: Anastasios Nikolaidis

Course code: AEFF 348

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Intermediate/Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Conclusions from a better knowledge not only of those who converse with Socrates at a philosophical level, but also of all those who belong to his circle or are simply present at his discussions. Another aim is to sensitize the class to the dramatic/theatrical dimension of the Platonic dialogues.

Prerequisites: AFF 010/020 and AFF 100

Course contents: From the many individuals who parade in the Platonic dialogues, some converse with Socrates at a philosophical level, some chat with him in a usual and unsophisticated manner, and some are simply present at his discussions. The seminar students are expected to locate all these individuals, classify them according to their social position and their role in the particular dialogues and, finally, compose brief biographical portraits.

Recommended reading:

Blondell, R., The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues, Cambridge 2002.

Kahn, Charles, Plato and the Socratic Dialogue: The Philosophical Use of a Literary Form, Cambridge 1996.

Nails, Debra, Agora, Academy, and the Conduct of Philosophy, Boston 1995.

Nails, Debra, The People of Plato. A Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics, Cambridge 2002.

Taylor, ,. Plato.The Man and his Work, London 71960 (1926).

Teaching methods: Discussion combined with instruction and guidance

Assessment methods: Oral presentation and written essay

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Latin Reading and Prose Class II

Name of lecturer: to be announced

Course code: LAFF 020

Type of course: Exercise

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/ 2

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The course aims a) at extending the students knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language, b) at improving their reading skills, and c) at developing their skill in Latin composition.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Subordinate clauses and indirect speech. Morphology and etymology. Differences between Latin and Greek syntax. Latin prose composition. Selected Latin prose and/or verse texts.

Recommended reading:

. , , 1979.

.. , , 1979.

Teaching methods: Exercises and lectures

Assessment methods: Participation in class and written exams

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: A Survey of Latin Literature

Name of lecturer: Michael Paschalis

Course code: LAFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization of students with the basic Latin genres, their Greek origins and their reception.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: The course is an introductory survey of Latin Literature designed to familiarize students with the basic genres, their Greek origins and their reception. The reading and discussion of passages of ancient literary criticism constitutes an integral and vital part of the course.

Recommended reading:

Stephen Harrison (ed), A Companion to Latin Literature, Oxford 2005;

Gian Biagio Conte, Latin Literature: A History, Baltimore / London 1994;

Christopher S. Mackay, Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History, Cambridge 2005

Teaching methods: Lecturing

Assessment methods: Written exam

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Latin Didactic Poetry: An Anthology

Name of lecturer: Michael Paschalis

Course code: LAFF ???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: Any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Tracing the features and development of Latin Didactic Poetry.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: Translation and interpretation of selected passages from Lucretius De rerum natura, Virgils Georgics, and Ovids Ars amatoria. Issues to be discussed: the appearance, origins, features and themes, representatives, evolution, intertextual relations and reception of Latin Didactic poetry.

Recommended reading:

B. Effe, Dichtung und Lehre: Untersuchungen zur Typologie des antiken Lehrgedichts, Munich 1977

P. Toohey, Epic Lessons: An Introduction to Ancient Didactic Poetry, London 1996

Katharina Volk, The Poetics of Latin Didactic, Oxford 2002

Monica Gale, Didactic Epic, in Stephen Harrison (ed.), A Companion to Latin Literature, Oxford 2005, 101-115.

Teaching methods: Lecturing

Assessment methods: Written exam

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Suetonius

Name of lecturer: Stelios Panayotakis

Course code: LAFF 189

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

A comprehensive reading of selected texts from the Lives of Caesars will enable students both to familiarize themselves with the genre of Roman Biography, and to appreciate Suetonius style, method of composition and literary technique.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

The aim of this text-based subject is, on the one hand, to read and discuss a wide selection of passages from Suetonius Lives of Caesars from many different angles (language, style, compositional technique), and, on the other, to highlight the wider context of Roman Imperial Biography and Suetonius individual contribution.

Recommended reading:

W. Steidle, Sueton und die antike Biographie, 2. ed., Muenchen 1963;

A. Wallace-Hadrill, Suetonius, the scholar and his Caesars, London 1984;

U. Lambrecht, Herrscherbild und Principatsidee in Suetons Kaiserbiographien : Untersuchungen zur Caesar und zur Augustus-vita, Bonn 1984.

Teaching methods: Lectures, class participation and discussion

Assessment methods: Written exam

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The literary portrait in Roman historiography and biography

Name of lecturer: Stelios Panayotakis

Course code: LAFF ???

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3rd, 4th

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of the students with the theory and practice of ancient physiognomy, and with the ways in which its principles may apply to Roman historiography and biography. Acquisition of special research skills and familiarization with special research methodology.

Prerequisites: LAFF 100, LAFF 010 or 020

Course contents:

This seminar aims at examining descriptions of physical appearance of powerful men found in Roman historiography and biography (especially, Suetonius, Ammianus Marcellinus, the Scriptores Historiae Augustae) in the light of evidence from rhetorical manuals and physiognomical theory after Aristotle.

Recommended reading:

M. Gleason, Making men : sophists and self-presentation in ancient Rome, Princeton 1995;

T. Barton, Power and knowledge : astrology, physiognomics, and medicine under the Roman Empire, Ann Arbor 1994;

.. Sassi, The science of man in ancient Greece, Chicago 2001.

Teaching methods: Basic introduction given by the instructor and students participation and presentation of selected topics.

Assessment methods: class participation, oral presentation and written essay.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

DIVISION OF BYZANTINE AND MODERN GREEK PHILOLOGY

Course title: Selected Byzantine texts: a reader

Name of lecturer: Marina Detoraki

Course code: BYFF 010

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The primary aim is the practice of students in the translation into modern Greek of representative Byzantine texts (passages) from different literary genres. Familiarization of students with the linguistic and stylistic variety employed by Byzantine authors.

Prerequisites: BYFF 100 (desirable, not necessary).

Course contents: Reading and translation of selected Byzantine literature. Teaching of the method and the technique of translation and commentary on the language and style of Byzantine writers. By its nature the course becomes a stylistic exercise on modern Greek language.

Recommended reading:

-

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Hymns from the Triodion cycle

Name of lecturer: Manolis Patedakis

Course code: BYFF 128

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Introduction to an area in Byzantine hymnography that has not been studied in a great extent by modern scholarship. Primarily, we intend to present the hymnographical construction through this particular festal period of the Byzantine calendar. Secondly, we will examine selected hymns and their features.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: he poetical texts in the services of the mobile festal cycle before and after Easter are known as the hymns of Triodion. The content of those hymns and the ritual of the services are arranged through the ten weeks period of Triodion, followed in festal calendar by the period of Pentecostarion. We will study the ideological frame that has created the above textual tradition; at the same time we will comment on specific hymns for their poetical features as well as for their place in the wider dramatic structure of each service.

Recommended reading:

E. Wellesz, A History of Byzantine Music and Hymnography, Oxford 1961

Mother Mary f. K. Ware (tr.), The Lenten Triodion, London;Boston1978

. itsakis, , Thessalonica 1971

Teaching methods: Lectures. Notes and handouts with selected hymns under examination.

Assessment methods: Written examination.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The first four Crusades in Byzantine authors

Name of lecturer: Marina Loukaki

Course code: BYFF 170

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

1. Familiarization of students with the language of specific Byzantine authors (historians and rhetors) 2. Learning of the historical background 3. Familiarization with the literary approach of historical events by byzantine historical and rhetorical texts.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: After the study of the historical events concerning the first four Crusades we shall read and compare select passages from texts written by byzantine rhetors and historians of the 12th century.

Recommended reading:

St. Runciman, , .1-3, 2006.

J. Harris, , 2004.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: George Pisidess Epic Poetry

Name of lecturer: Ioannis Vassis

Course code: BYFF 232

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 4/6/8

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the subject

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: The early Byzantine encomiastic epic: tradition and breakthrough. Historical poems by George of Pisidia concerning the expeditions of the emperor Heraclius against the Persians and the siege of Constantinople by the Avars (first half of the seventh century): Expeditio persica, Bellum avaricum, Heraclias.

Recommended reading:

A. Pertusi, Giorgio di Pisidia poemi. I. Panegirici epici, Ettal 1960

L. Tartaglia, Carmi di Giorgio di Pisidia, Torino 1998

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The woman in Byzantine hagiography

Name of lecturer: Marina Detoraki

Course code: BYFF 313

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/ 4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The study of the representation of women and of the female sex in Byzantine hagiography (Passions, Lives and Narrations), with emphasis in its individual and symbolic aspects. Byzantine mentalities regarding women will be particularly discussed throughout the course.

Prerequisites: BYFF 100

Course contents: Through the study of selected hagiographical texts students will analyse different literary "versions" of the female sex, including, on the one hand, the woman as symbol of sin and the total rejection of femininity (the famous cases of holy women disguised as men), and, on the other, the literary portaits of female beauty.

Recommended reading:

Constantinou Stavroula, Female corporeal performances : reading the body in Byzantine passions and lives of holy women, : Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Studia Byzantina Upsaliensia, Uppsala 2005.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Greek paleography and codicology

Name of lecturer: Marina Loukaki

Course code: BYFF 369

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/ 4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of the students (3rd and 4th year) with the sciences of paleography and codicology. Practice in reading and transcription of differents greek scripts.

Prerequisites: BYFF 100

Course contents: Reading and transcription of differents forms of greek script on the basis of selected examples from byzantine manuscripts.

Recommended reading:

. Mioni, , , 1979

. Hunger, , , 1995

Teaching methods: Lecturing with audio aids, questioning, weekly homework.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Byzantine Epigraphy

Name of lecturer: Manolis Patedakis

Course code: BYFF 373

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3 / 4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The general aim of the seminar will be an introduction to Byzantine Epigraphy and issues relevant to its evolution during the Byzantine period.

Prerequisites: BYFF 100, FF 010 or 020; the successful participation in the course BYFF 010 is desirable.

Course contents: Starting from the study of modern literature on the subject, students will practice on the transcription, reading and classification of published and unpublished inscriptions. On the other hand, they will undertake to prepare specialized papers on types and form of the script, content and preserved epigraphic material from each period, orthography, historic, educational and literary value of certain inscriptions, as well as existing or possible collections of byzantine inscriptions. We will pay particular attention to specimens from frescoes preserved from the Byzantine period.

Recommended reading:

Denis Feissel, Chroniques d pigraphie Byzantine. 1987-2004, Paris: Coll. De France, Centre de recherch d histoire et civilisation de Byzance, Monographies 20, 2006

. adhdan (ed.), The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, New York Oxford, 1991, pigraphy

C. Mango, yzantine epigraphy (4th-10th centuries), in: Paleografia e Codicologia Greca, . 1, lexandria 1991, 235-249, tabl. 1 30.

N. Moutsopoulos, . , Thessalonica 1977

. utsopoulos, La morphologie des inscriptions Byzantines et post-byzantines de Grce, Cyrillomethodianum 3 (1975), 53-105

M. S. Patedakis, 13 14 , . 2006, (Forthcoming)

Teaching methods: Introduction, presentations, discussion.

Assessment methods: Oral presentation and performance, written essay.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek.

Course title: Introduction to Modern Greek Literature

Name of lecturer: Alexis Politis

Course code: NEFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/ 2

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 6

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the Subject

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Examination of important notions which affect the definition of the Modern Greek (Nation, People, Civilisation; Language, the Language Problem, the Origins, the Consciousness). Discussion of various notions regarding literature (its definitions, the idea of literariness, literary genres, uses of and aesthetic judgement on literature). Basic issues of philology, i.e. the study of literature: editing, morphology and its approaches, the scholars basic tools. Selected texts will also be analysed.

Recommended reading:

Teaching methods: lecturing, analysis of texts

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Introduction to Modern Greek Philology

Name of lecturer: D. Polychronakis.

Course code: NEFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: Any

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 6

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the basic issues and tools of philology

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: An introduction to the history, the theory and the hermeneutics of Modern Greek Philology and Literature.

Recommended reading: L. Politis, . G. Veloudis, . P. Mastrodimitris, .

Teaching methods: Lecturing and discussion.

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Vitsenzos Kornaross Erotokritos

Name of lecturer: Stephanos Kaklamanis

Course code: NEFF 130

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of students with the language and poetics of Erotokritos.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: Introduction to the Cretan Romance. The romance Erotokritos: manuscripts and early printed editions, authorship, dating, identification of the Italian model, secondary sources. Dramaturgical analysis. Aesthetics of language and metre. The ars poetica of Vitsentzos Kornaros.

Recommended reading:

, , , 2000.

, David Holton, 2002.

Massimo Peri, . , 1999.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Rationalism and Mysticism in Prose Texts of the 1930 Generation

Name of lecturer: Angela Kastrinaki

Course code: NEFF???

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Exercising in deciphering difficult symbolic texts.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: In a period, in which rationalism represents the mainstream in Greek thinking, we will examine mostly literary texts expressing mystical ideas.

Recommended reading:

Mario Vitti, 30. , 1995.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The Greek Sonnet

Name of lecturer: D. Polychronakis.

Course code: NEFF ???

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Familiarization with the genre of the sonnet and its metrics.

Prerequisites: NEFF 100

Course contents: An introduction to the theory and the history of the sonnet. Students will analyze thematically and morphologically Greek sonnets of the 19th and the 20th cent.

Recommended reading: L. Politis, . K. Mitsakis, . K. Asimakopoulos,

Teaching methods: Discussion and oral presentation.

Assessment methods: Oral presentation and written essay.

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

DIVISION OF LINGUISTICS

Course title: Phonology of ancient Greek language

Name of lecturer: Dimitra Delli

Course code: GLOF 151

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 2 /3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course:

Familiarization with the phonology of Greek language

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

The evaluation of the phonology of ancient Greek language from the beginning until the more recent antiquity with reference to the most important dialect idioms. Methods and problems of analysis.

Recommended reading:

Allen, W. S. 19873. Vox graeca: The pronunciation of classical Greek, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. . . . & . . , Vox graeca: , , [ ], 2000.

Colvin, S. 2007. A Historical Greek Reader. Mycenaean to the Koin. Oxford: University Press.

BRIXHE Claude, 1988, "La langue de l'tranger non-grec chez Aristophane, L'tranger dans le monde grec, Actes du colloque organis par l'Institut d'tudes Anciennes, Nancy 1987, Pres. univ. de Nancy, 113-137.

BUCK, C. D. 1955. The Greek Dialects. Grammar, selected inscriptions, glossary, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Khner R. & F. Blass [1890] 1978. Ausfhrliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache. Erster teil: elementar und formenlehre. Erster Band (I, 1). Hannover: Verlag Hahnsche Buchhandlung.

LEJEUNE, M. 1972. Phontique historique du mycnien et du grec ancien. Paris: Klincksieck.

TEODORSSON, S. T. 1974. The Phonemic System of the Attic Dialect, 400-340 B.C. Gteborg-Lund: Studia Graeca et Latina Gothoburgensia XXXII.

TEODORSSON, S. T. 1978. The Phonemic System of Attic in the Hellenistic Period, Gteborg-Lund: Studia Graeca et Latina Gothoburgensia XL.

, . 1971. . , . OB': 114- 143.

, . 1985. . . .

, . [1949] 1990. . : .

, .-. (.). 2001. . . : . [ ].

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: On the Phonology of the Greek Dialects

Name of lecturer: Ioanna Kappa

Course code: GLOF 152

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate/advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

ntroductry course to the phonology of Greek Dialects

Prerequisites: Introduction to Phonology (GLOF 147)

Course contents:

Presentation of the main phonological characteristics of the greek dialects (Northern and South dialects, Cypriot, Cappadocian, Pontic), as well as of the similarities and differences among them.

Recommended reading:

1) . (2001) . : .

2) (2000). . . ISBN 960-85931-8-2

3) Newton, B. E. (1972). The generative interpretation of dialect. A study of Modern Greek phonology.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Teaching methods: Lecture

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Morphology

Name of lecturer: Elena Anagnostopoulou

Course code: GLOF 156

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Introduction to Morphology

Prerequisites: GLOF 100

Course contents:

This is a general introduction which covers those notions that are fundamental to morphological theory. The course treats morphological categories, morphological processes, inflection derivation and compounding, the place of morphology in grammar, the difference between lexicalist and syntactic approaches to morphology.Technical machinery is explained in a way accessible to students with no previous training in formalisms.

Recommended reading:

. (2001) . : . .

Anderson, S. 1992. A-Morphous Morphology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Aronoff, M. 1994. Morphology by Itself. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Halle, M. and A. Marantz. 1993. Distributed Morphology and the Pieces of Inflection. In: Kenneth Hale and Samuel Jay Keyser (eds.), The View from Building 20: 111-176. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Spencer, A. 1991. Morphological Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Spencer, A & A. Zwicky. 1998. Handbook of Morphology. Oxford: Blackwell.

Teaching methods: Lecture

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Syntax I

Name of lecturer: Elena Anagnostopoulou

Course code: GLOF 165

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Introduction to Syntax

Prerequisites: none

Course contents:

This is a general introduction which covers those notions that are fundamental to syntactic theory. The course treats basic constituent structure, basic argument structure and introduces the concept of syntactic dependencies. Technical machinery is explained in a way accessible to students with no previous training in formalisms. Comparison between traditional and theoretical syntax in the description of Modern Greek.

Recommended reading:

Pinker S. (1995/2000). . . : . .

-, . 2002. . . : .

-Warburton . (1992). . : . .

Teaching methods: Lecture

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: The ancient Greek vocabulary

Name of lecturer: Dimitra Delli

Course code: GLOF 337

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the formation of the ancient Greek vocabulary.

Prerequisites: GLOF 100

Course contents:

This seminar deals with: 1. The ancient Greek vocabulary from the 13th century BC (Linear B texts) up to the Hellenistic times, when Greek language altered to Hellenistic Koine spreads through the greatest part of eastern Mediterranean satisfying the contemporary communicative requirements of a constantly increasing Greek-speaking population. At the same time Hellenistic Koine gets in touch with other languages as Latin and Hebrew, which have an obvious influence on it. 2. The classical Greek vocabulary categorization (vocabulary inherited by Indo-European language, loan words and vocabulary created on the basis of classical Greek derivation and synthesis rules). 3. The ancient Greek dialects vocabulary.

Recommended reading:

Andriotis, N. 1974. Lexikon der Archaismen in neugriechischen Dialekten. Wien: Verlag der sterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.

Bader, Fr., 1965. Les composs grecs du type de Demiourgos. Paris: Klincksieck.

Blanc A. & A. Christol (.), 1999. Langues en contact dans lAntiquit. Aspects lexicaux. tudes anciennes 19.

CHANTRAINE Pierre, 1958 [3 . .]. Grammaire homrique I. Paris: Klincksieck.

CHANTRAINE Pierre, 19672, Morphologie historique du grec, . . . , , 19982, : -. .

CHANTRAINE, P. 1933 [. 1979]. La formation des noms en grec ancien. Collection Linguistique publie par la Socit de Linguistique de Paris XXXVIII. Paris: Klincksieck.

CHANTRAINE, P. 1968-1980. Dictionnaire tymologique de la langue grecque. Histoire des mots. Supplment 1999. Paris: Klincksieck.

Colvin, S. 2007. A Historical Greek Reader. Mycenaean to the Koin. Oxford: University Press.

Fraser, P. M. & E. Matthews (.) 1987-. A lexicon of Greek Personal Names. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Frisk, H. 1960-1972. Griechisches etymologisches Wrterbuch. Heidelberg: C. Winter.

Khner R. & F. Blass 1978 [1892]. Ausfhrliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache. Erster teil: elementar und formenlehre. Zweiter Band. Hannover: Verlag Hahnsche Buchhandlung.

Latte, K. (ed.), 1953-. Hesychii Alexandrini Lexicon. Copenhagen: E. Munksgaard.

LiddelL H. G., Scott R., & H. S. JONES, 19409. A Greek-englisch Lexicon. Supplement 1996. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Masson O., 1990. Onomastica graeca selecta. Nanterre: Univ. de Paris X.

Mignot, X. 1972. Recherches sur le suffixe , - (, -). Des origines la fin du IVe sicle avant J.-C. Paris: Klincksieck.

Perpillou, J.-L. 1973. Les substantifs grecs en -. Paris: Klincksieck.

Perpillou, J.-L. 1999. Le suppletisme entre et en grec arcaque. Des dialectes grecs aux Lois de Gortyne. tudes Anciennes 21: 47-58.

, . . 1971. -*yo- / -*eyo- . . : / / . 13.

., 1999 [8 .]. . : [ ].

, . 1938 [1993]. . . 3 . . : [ . ].

, .-. (.). 2001. . . : . [ ].

Teaching methods: lecturing

Assessment methods: oral presentation and written paper

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Issues from the Phonology of the Greek Dialects

Name of lecturer: Ioanna Kappa

Course code: GLOF 339

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: intermediate/advanced

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester: Spring

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Seminar on the phonology of Greek Dialects

Prerequisites: Introduction to Phonology (GLOF 147)

Course contents:

S