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  • College Physics Student Solutions Manual Chapter 28

    201

    CHAPTER 28: SPECIAL RELATIVITY 28.2 SIMULTANEITY AND TIME DILATION

    1. (a) What is if cv 250.0= ? (b) If cv 500.0= ?

    Solution (a) Using the definition of , where cv 250.0= :

    0328.1)250.0(112/1

    2

    22/1

    2

    2

    =

    =

    =

    cc

    cv

    (b) Again using the definition of , now where cv 500.0= :

    15.11547.1)500.0(12/1

    2

    2

    ==

    =

    cc

    Note that is unitless, and the results are reported to three digits to show the difference from 1 in each case.

    6. A neutron lives 900 s when at rest relative to an observer. How fast is the neutron moving relative to an observer who measures its life span to be 2065 s?

    Solution Using 0tt = , where

    2/1

    2

    2

    1

    =cv

    , we see that:

    .12944.2s 900s 2065

    2/1

    2

    2

    0

    ===

    =

    cv

    tt

    Squaring the equation gives 22

    21

    2

    222

    vcc

    cvc

    =

    =

    Cross-multiplying gives 22

    22

    cvc = , and solving for speed finally gives:

  • College Physics Student Solutions Manual Chapter 28

    202

    ccccccv 900.090003.0)2944.2(

    11112/1

    2

    2/1

    22

    22 ==

    =

    ==

    11. Unreasonable Results (a) Find the value of for the following situation. An Earth-bound observer measures 23.9 h to have passed while signals from a high-velocity space probe indicate that h 0.24 have passed on board. (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?

    Solution (a) Using the equation ,0tt = we can solve for :

    996.09958.0h 24.0h 23.9

    0

    ===

    =tt

    (b) cannot be less than 1.

    (c) The earthbound observer must measure a longer time in the observer's rest frame than the ship bound observer. The assumption that time is longer in the moving ship is unreasonable.

    28.3 LENGTH CONTRACTION

    14. (a) How far does the muon in Example 28.1 travel according to the Earth-bound observer? (b) How far does it travel as viewed by an observer moving with it? Base your calculation on its velocity relative to the Earth and the time it lives (proper time). (c) Verify that these two distances are related through length contraction 3.20= .

    Solution Using the values given in Example 28.1:

    (a)

    km 1.39m 101.386s) 1087.4)(m/s 10998.2)(950.0(

    s) 1087.4)(950.0(368

    60

    ===

    ==

    cctvL

    (b) km 0.433m 104.329)s 1052.1)(m/s 10998.2)(950.0( 2680 ====ctvL

    (c) km 0.433m 104.333.20

    m 101.386 230 ====L

    L

  • College Physics Student Solutions Manual Chapter 28

    203

    28.4 RELATIVISTIC ADDITION OF VELOCITIES

    22. If a spaceship is approaching the Earth at c100.0 and a message capsule is sent toward it at c100.0 relative to the Earth, what is the speed of the capsule relative to the ship?

    Solution Using the equation )/(1 2cuv

    uvu+

    += , we can add the relativistic velocities:

    [ ] cccccc

    cuvuvu 198.0

    /)100.0)(100.0(1100.0100.0

    )/(1 22=

    +

    +=

    +

    +=

    28. When a missile is shot from one spaceship towards another, it leaves the first at c950.0 and approaches the other at c750.0 . What is the relative velocity of the two

    ships?

    Solution We are given: cu 750.0= and cu 950.0= . We want to find v , starting with the

    equation )/(1 2cuv

    uvu+

    += . First multiply both sides by the denominator:

    uvcuuvu +=

    + 2 , then solving for v gives:

    [ ] cccccc

    cuuuuv 696.0

    1/)950.0)(750.0(750.0950.0

    1)/( 22=

    =

    =

    The velocity v is the speed measured by the second spaceship, so the minus sign indicates the ships are moving apart from each other (v is in the opposite direction as u ).

    34. (a) All but the closest galaxies are receding from our own Milky Way Galaxy. If a galaxy ly 100.12 9 away is receding from us at c900.0 , at what velocity relative to us must we

    send an exploratory probe to approach the other galaxy at c990.0 , as measured from that galaxy? (b) How long will it take the probe to reach the other galaxy as measured from the Earth? You may assume that the velocity of the other galaxy remains constant. (c) How long will it then take for a radio signal to be beamed back? (All of this is possible in principle, but not practical.)

    Solution Note that all answers to this problem are reported to 5 significant figures, to distinguish the results.

  • College Physics Student Solutions Manual Chapter 28

    204

    (a) We are given cv 900.0= and cu 990.0= . Starting with the equation

    )/(1 2cuvuvu+

    += , we now want to solve for u . First multiply both sides by the

    denominator: uvcuvuu +=+ 2 ; then solving for the probes speed gives:

    cccc

    cccuvvuu 99947.0

    ]/)900.0)(990.0[(1)900.0(990.0

    )/(1 22=

    =

    =

    (b) When the probe reaches the other galaxy, it will have traveled a distance (as seen on Earth) of 0 vtxd += because the galaxy is moving away from us. As seen from

    Earth, cu 9995.0= , so .0uvtx

    udt

    +

    =

    =

    Now, vtxtu += 0 and y 101.2064ly 1y) (1

    0.9000.99947ly 1012.0 1190 =

    =

    =c

    ccvuxt

    (c) The radio signal travels at the speed of light, so the return time t is given by

    ,0cvtx

    cdt

    +== assuming the signal is transmitted as soon as the probe reaches

    the other galaxy. Using the numbers, we can determine the time:

    y 101.2058y) 10.2064(0.900c)(1ly 101.20 111110

    =+

    =c

    t

    28.5 RELATIVISTIC MOMENTUM

    39. What is the velocity of an electron that has a momentum of m/skg 1004.3 21 ? Note that you must calculate the velocity to at least four digits to see the difference from c .

    Solution Beginning with the equation

    ( )[ ] 21221 cumumup

    == we can solve for the speed u .

    First cross-multiply and square both sides, giving 22

    2

    2

    2

    1 upm

    cu

    =

    Then, solving for 2u gives ( ) ( ) ( )2222

    2222

    //1/1

    cpmp

    cpmu

    +=

    +=

  • College Physics Student Solutions Manual Chapter 28

    205

    Finally, taking the square root gives ( )222 / cpmpu

    += .

    Taking the values for the mass of the electron and the speed of light to five significant figures gives:

    ( ) ( ) ( )[ ]m/s 102.988

    kg 102.9979/m/skg 103.34kg 109.1094

    m/skg 103.04

    8

    1/222821231

    21

    =

    +

    =

    u

    28.6 RELATIVISTIC ENERGY

    48. (a) Using data from Table 7.1, calculate the mass converted to energy by the fission of 1.00 kg of uranium. (b) What is the ratio of mass destroyed to the original mass,

    mm / ?

    Solution (a) From Table 7.1, the energy released from the nuclear fission of 1.00 kg of uranium is J 108.0 13=E . So, 2released0 mcEE == , we get

    ( )( )

    g .890kg 108.89m/s 103.00

    J 100.8 428

    13

    2 ==

    =

    = cEm

    (b) To calculate the ratio, simply divide by the original mass:

    ( )( )

    10.98 108.89kg 1.00

    kg 108.89 442

    4

    ==

    =

    mm

    52. A -meson is a particle that decays into a muon and a massless particle. The -meson has a rest mass energy of 139.6 MeV, and the muon has a rest mass energy of 105.7 MeV. Suppose the -meson is at rest and all of the missing mass goes into the muons kinetic energy. How fast will the muon move?

    Solution Using the equation 2relKE mc= , we can determine the kinetic energy of the muon by determining the missing mass: 222rel )1()(KE cmcmmmc ===

    Solving for will give us a way of calculating the speed of the muon. From the

  • College Physics Student Solutions Manual Chapter 28

    206

    equation above, we see that:

    .32072.1MeV 105.7MeV 139.61 ===

    =+

    =

    mm

    mmmm

    mmm

    Now, use ( )[ ] 21221 = cv or ,11 22

    2

    =

    cv

    so

    cccv 0.6532(1.32072)

    1111 22 ===

    58. Find the kinetic energy in MeV of a neutron with a measured life span of 2065 s, given its rest energy is 939.6 MeV, and rest life span is 900s.

    Solution From Exercise 28.6, we know that = 2.2944, so we can determine the kinetic energy of the neutron: ( )( ) .MeV 1216MeV 939.612944.2)1(KE 2rel === mc

    64. (a) Calculate the energy released by the destruction of 1.00 kg of mass. (b) How many kilograms could be lifted to a 10.0 km height by this amount of energy?

    Solution (a) Using the equation 2mcE = , we can calculate the rest mass energy of a 1.00 kg mass. This rest mass energy is the energy released by the destruction of that amount of mass:

    ( )( ) J 108.99J 108.988m/s 102.998kg 1.00 161682released ==== mcE

    (b) Using the equation mgh=PE , we can determine how much mass can be raised to

    a height of 10.0 km: ( )( ) kg 109.17m 1010.0m/s 9.80J 108.99PE 11

    32

    16

    =

    ==

    ghm