An integrin-α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin ternary complex …...Integrin α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin...

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1654 Research Article Introduction Integrins are α,β heterodimeric receptors that mediate cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix and enable cell migration. Integrin-ligand engagement induces the assembly of receptor-associated signalling complexes and transduces force between the substratum and the cytoskeleton, thereby controlling cell movement. Although many integrins are ubiquitously expressed, others fulfil specific roles. The α4 integrins are expressed primarily by leukocytes and derivatives of the embryonic neural crest, including melanocytes, and mediate rapid migration and invasion of these cells during development and immune responses (Bochner et al., 1991; Gosslar et al., 1996; Hemler et al., 1990). The α4 integrin subunit pairs with one of two β-subunits, β1 or β7, to form receptors that bind either fibronectin and VCAM-1 (α4β1; VLA-4) (Elices et al., 1990; Mould et al., 1990; Wayner et al., 1989) or MAdCAM-1 (α4β7) (Berlin et al., 1993), respectively. As β1 integrin dimerises with a range of α- subunits, the specific properties of α4β1 integrin are determined by the interactions of the α4 subunit. These unique properties are exemplified by the independence of α4β1 integrin from coreceptors during adhesion to fibronectin (Mostafavi-Pour et al., 2003). In contrast to the independent nature of α4β1 integrin, the closely related α5β1 integrin requires synergistic engagement of syndecan 4 for focal adhesion formation on fibronectin (Bass et al., 2007). There is interest in elucidating the unique properties of α4 integrin, as the rapid formation of α4β1-containing adhesions, during leukocyte arrest and migration, is a critical early stage of inflammatory responses, and a validated therapeutic target (Humphries et al., 1994). Unique among integrin α-subunits are α4 and the closely related α9 subunit, in that their cytoplasmic domain can bind directly to paxillin in vitro (Liu et al., 2001; Liu et al., 1999). A dynamic interaction between paxillin and α4 subunit is essential for regulation of motility since disruption of paxillin binding by mutation of an α4 integrin cytoplasmic residue (Y991A), phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain at S988 by PKA (Han J. et al., 2001; Liu et al., 1999), or enforced α4 integrin-paxillin association through expression of a fused bimolecular chimera (Han et al., 2003), all lead to increased cell spreading and decreased cell migration. Subsequent studies have shown that α4- paxillin binding is necessary for initial strengthening of adhesion upon cell binding to VCAM-1 under shear stress (Alon et al., 2005) and for leukocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation in vivo (Feral et al., 2006). Clustering of α4 integrin cytodomains has also been found to result in cell motility and Src activation by an unresolved, paxillin-independent mechanism that is indicative of alternative associations of α4β1 integrin (Hsia et al., 2005). In the present study we identify novel interactions of both α4 integrin and paxillin with a 14-3-3 isoform. Formation of this ternary complex facilitates localized Cdc42 regulation and matrix-directed cell migration. α4 integrins are used by leukocytes and neural crest derivatives for adhesion and migration during embryogenesis, immune responses and tumour invasion. The pro-migratory activity of α4 integrin is mediated in part through the direct binding of the cytoplasmic domain to paxillin. Here, using intermolecular FRET and biochemical analyses, we report a novel interaction of the α4 integrin cytoplasmic domain with 14-3-3ζ. This interaction depends on serine phosphorylation of α4 integrin at a site (S978) distinct from that which regulates paxillin binding (S988). Using a combination of metabolic labelling and targeted mass spectrometry by multiple reaction monitoring we demonstrate the low stoichiometry phosphorylation of S978. The interaction between α4 integrin and 14-3-3ζ is enhanced by the direct association between 14-3-3ζ and paxillin, resulting in the formation of a ternary complex that stabilises the recruitment of each component. Although pair-wise interaction between α4 integrin and paxillin is sufficient for normal Rac1 regulation, the integrity of the ternary complex is essential for focused Cdc42 activity at the lamellipodial leading edge and directed cell movement. Taken together, these data identify a key signalling nexus mediating α4 integrin-dependent migration. Supplementary material available online at http://jcs.biologists.org/cgi/content/full/122/10/1654/DC1 Key words: Integrin, 14-3-3, Paxillin, Cdc42, Migration Summary An integrin-α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin ternary complex mediates localised Cdc42 activity and accelerates cell migration Nicholas O. Deakin 1, * ,‡ , Mark D. Bass 1, *, Stacey Warwood 1 , Julia Schoelermann 2,3 , Zohreh Mostafavi-Pour 1,§ , David Knight 1 , Christoph Ballestrem 1 and Martin J. Humphries 1,¶ 1 Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, UK 2 Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569, Germany 3 Department of Biophysical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, INF 235, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Present address: Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA § Present address: Department of Biochemistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran Author for correspondence (e-mail: [email protected]) Accepted 5 February 2009 Journal of Cell Science 122, 1654-1664 Published by The Company of Biologists 2009 doi:10.1242/jcs.049130 Journal of Cell Science JCS ePress online publication date 28 April 2009
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Transcript of An integrin-α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin ternary complex …...Integrin α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin...

  • 1654 Research Article

    IntroductionIntegrins are α,β heterodimeric receptors that mediate cell adhesionto the extracellular matrix and enable cell migration. Integrin-ligandengagement induces the assembly of receptor-associated signallingcomplexes and transduces force between the substratum and thecytoskeleton, thereby controlling cell movement. Although manyintegrins are ubiquitously expressed, others fulfil specific roles. Theα4 integrins are expressed primarily by leukocytes and derivativesof the embryonic neural crest, including melanocytes, and mediaterapid migration and invasion of these cells during development andimmune responses (Bochner et al., 1991; Gosslar et al., 1996;Hemler et al., 1990). The α4 integrin subunit pairs with one of twoβ-subunits, β1 or β7, to form receptors that bind either fibronectinand VCAM-1 (α4β1; VLA-4) (Elices et al., 1990; Mould et al.,1990; Wayner et al., 1989) or MAdCAM-1 (α4β7) (Berlin et al.,1993), respectively. As β1 integrin dimerises with a range of α-subunits, the specific properties of α4β1 integrin are determinedby the interactions of the α4 subunit. These unique properties areexemplified by the independence of α4β1 integrin from coreceptorsduring adhesion to fibronectin (Mostafavi-Pour et al., 2003). Incontrast to the independent nature of α4β1 integrin, the closelyrelated α5β1 integrin requires synergistic engagement of syndecan4 for focal adhesion formation on fibronectin (Bass et al., 2007).There is interest in elucidating the unique properties of α4 integrin,as the rapid formation of α4β1-containing adhesions, during

    leukocyte arrest and migration, is a critical early stage ofinflammatory responses, and a validated therapeutic target(Humphries et al., 1994).

    Unique among integrin α-subunits are α4 and the closely relatedα9 subunit, in that their cytoplasmic domain can bind directly topaxillin in vitro (Liu et al., 2001; Liu et al., 1999). A dynamicinteraction between paxillin and α4 subunit is essential forregulation of motility since disruption of paxillin binding bymutation of an α4 integrin cytoplasmic residue (Y991A),phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain at S988 by PKA (HanJ. et al., 2001; Liu et al., 1999), or enforced α4 integrin-paxillinassociation through expression of a fused bimolecular chimera(Han et al., 2003), all lead to increased cell spreading anddecreased cell migration. Subsequent studies have shown that α4-paxillin binding is necessary for initial strengthening of adhesionupon cell binding to VCAM-1 under shear stress (Alon et al., 2005)and for leukocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation in vivo(Feral et al., 2006). Clustering of α4 integrin cytodomains hasalso been found to result in cell motility and Src activation by anunresolved, paxillin-independent mechanism that is indicative ofalternative associations of α4β1 integrin (Hsia et al., 2005). Inthe present study we identify novel interactions of both α4 integrinand paxillin with a 14-3-3 isoform. Formation of this ternarycomplex facilitates localized Cdc42 regulation and matrix-directedcell migration.

    α4 integrins are used by leukocytes and neural crest derivativesfor adhesion and migration during embryogenesis, immuneresponses and tumour invasion. The pro-migratory activity ofα4 integrin is mediated in part through the direct binding ofthe cytoplasmic domain to paxillin. Here, using intermolecularFRET and biochemical analyses, we report a novel interactionof the α4 integrin cytoplasmic domain with 14-3-3ζ. Thisinteraction depends on serine phosphorylation of α4 integrinat a site (S978) distinct from that which regulates paxillinbinding (S988). Using a combination of metabolic labelling andtargeted mass spectrometry by multiple reaction monitoring wedemonstrate the low stoichiometry phosphorylation of S978.The interaction between α4 integrin and 14-3-3ζ is enhancedby the direct association between 14-3-3ζ and paxillin, resulting

    in the formation of a ternary complex that stabilises therecruitment of each component. Although pair-wise interactionbetween α4 integrin and paxillin is sufficient for normal Rac1regulation, the integrity of the ternary complex is essential forfocused Cdc42 activity at the lamellipodial leading edge anddirected cell movement. Taken together, these data identify akey signalling nexus mediating α4 integrin-dependentmigration.

    Supplementary material available online athttp://jcs.biologists.org/cgi/content/full/122/10/1654/DC1

    Key words: Integrin, 14-3-3, Paxillin, Cdc42, Migration

    Summary

    An integrin-α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin ternary complexmediates localised Cdc42 activity and accelerates cellmigrationNicholas O. Deakin1,*,‡, Mark D. Bass1,*, Stacey Warwood1, Julia Schoelermann2,3, Zohreh Mostafavi-Pour1,§,David Knight1, Christoph Ballestrem1 and Martin J. Humphries1,¶1Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, UK2Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569, Germany3Department of Biophysical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, INF 235, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this work‡Present address: Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA§Present address: Department of Biochemistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran¶Author for correspondence (e-mail: [email protected])

    Accepted 5 February 2009Journal of Cell Science 122, 1654-1664 Published by The Company of Biologists 2009doi:10.1242/jcs.049130

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    JCS ePress online publication date 28 April 2009

  • 1655Integrin α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin complex

    ResultsIdentification of a putative 14-3-3-binding motif that is specificto the α4 integrin cytoplasmic domainα4β1 integrin drives focal adhesion formation independently of acoreceptor, such as syndecan 4, or the activation of PKCα(Mostafavi-Pour et al., 2003). This behaviour is distinct from thatof α5β1 integrin and is indicative of unique properties of the α4subunit. To identify domains responsible for the specific propertiesof α4β1 integrin, a chimeric integrin comprising the α5 extracellularand transmembrane domain and the α4 cytoplasmic domain wascompared to full-length integrins for the ability to support focaladhesion formation. Chimeras have been used extensively foranalyses of integrin signalling, as they enable the functions of thecytoplasmic domain to be isolated (Chan et al., 1992; LaFlammeet al., 1992). The integrin α-subunits were expressed in Chinesehamster ovary cells (CHO-B2), which lack endogenous α5 and α4integrins, and the cells were spread on the appropriate recombinantligands of α4β1 or α5β1 integrins. Cells expressing full-length α5subunit spread on a 50K fragment of fibronectin containing thecentral cell-binding domain. However, prominent vinculin clustersonly formed upon co-engagement of syndecan 4 (Fig. 1A,B),recapitulating the behaviour of fibroblasts adhering to fibronectinthrough endogenous α5β1 integrin (Bass et al., 2007). Cellsexpressing the full-length α4 subunit spread on the alternativelyspliced IIICS domain of fibronectin (H/120). α4-expressing cellsformed vinculin-containing focal adhesions, even when the putativesyndecan-4-binding motif of H/120 had been substituted (Fig. 1C),recapitulating the behaviour of melanoma cells adhering to thisligand through endogenous α4β1 integrin (Mostafavi-Pour et al.,2003). Importantly, cells expressing the chimeric integrin behavedlike cells adhering through α4 integrin, forming focal adhesions onthe integrin ligand without need for additional stimuli (Fig. 1D).This result demonstrates that the unique features of the α4 integrinthat promote focal adhesion formation are contained within thecytoplasmic domain.

    A direct interaction between the α4 integrin cytoplasmicdomain and paxillin has already been characterised and found toinhibit cell migration (Liu et al., 2002). To identify additional α4-binding molecules that might act with paxillin to regulatemigration, a bioinformatic analysis of the α4 cytoplasmic domainwas conducted using the eukaryotic linear motif resource

    (Puntervoll et al., 2003). This analysis identified a putative modeII 14-3-3-binding motif, RX(φ)XS(P)XP (where φ designates anaromatic residue, and S(P) is phosphoserine), located betweenresidues R974 and L980 (Fig. 1E). Like the paxillin-bindingsequence, this motif is conserved in α4 between species, but isabsent from other integrin α-subunits, including α5 (Fig. 1E, anddata not shown). The 14-3-3 family comprises seven closelyrelated genes, encoding β-, ε-, η-, γ-, τ-, ζ- and σ-isoforms, whichfunction as homo- and heterodimers. All isoforms are highlyconserved in mammals (Aitken, 2006) and recognize peptidesequences that include phosphorylated serine or threonine residues(Muslin et al., 1996). Structural studies have shown that, whenbound to 14-3-3 dimers, the RX(φ)XS(P)XP motif adopts anextended conformation with a tight turn that includes the cis-proline residue at S(P)+2 (Yaffe et al., 1997). Although this prolineis absent from the α4 integrin cytoplasmic tail, secondary structurepredictions have proposed a β-turn between I979 and E983 thatcould provide a similar structural feature at the equivalent positionin the motif (Filardo and Cheresh, 1994).

    Phosphorylation of serine978 of the α4β1 integrin cytoplasmicdomainPhosphorylation of S978 is a key prerequisite of the hypothetical14-3-3 binding motif in the α4 integrin cytoplasmic domain. Ithas already been reported that S988 is phosphorylated by PKA,and it was noted that the S988A substitution did not entirelyabrogate serine phosphorylation of the α4 cytoplasmic domain(Han J. et al., 2001). To investigate phosphorylation of S978, wild-type and mutant α5/α4 chimeras were immunoprecipitatedfrom CHO-B2 cells following metabolic labelling with[32P]orthophosphate. Immunoprecipitated α5/α4 resolved into twobands during reducing SDS-PAGE because of the presence of amembrane-proximal cleavage site in the α5 extracellular domain.The 130 kDa band was recognised by an antibody directed againstthe α5 integrin extracellular domain (H-104), and the 25 kDa bandwas found by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry(LC-MS-MS) to include the α4 cytoplasmic domains. Directcomparison of the amount of 32P incorporated into wild-type orS988A α4-cytoplasmic domains confirmed the previously reportedreduction in phosphorylation of the S988A mutation, and alsorevealed residual phosphorylation of this mutant (Fig. 2A) (Han J.

    Fig. 1. The cytoplasmic motifs of fibronectin-binding integrinα-subunits. (A-D) CHO-B2 cells expressing α5 and α4 integrinsubunits or a chimeric integrin comprising the α5 extracellulardomain and the α4 cytoplasmic domain were spread onrecombinant fibronectin fragments, appropriate to theextracellular domain, and stained for vinculin (green) and actin(red). Scale bar: 10 μm. (E) Peptide sequence of the cytoplasmicdomains of the α4 and α5 integrin subunits indicating the α4paxillin-binding motif (green) and putative 14-3-3 mode IIinteraction motif (blue). Paxillin- (Y991A) and 14-3-3- (S978A)binding mutants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis(red).

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    et al., 2001). Double substitution of S978A and S988A completelyabolished 32P incorporation (Fig. 2B), indicating that the putative14-3-3-binding motif of the α5/α4 chimera is indeedphosphorylated. Examination of the phosphorylation ofendogenous α4 integrin required a different strategy. Followingtryptic digestion of α4 integrin immunoprecipitated from A375melanoma cells, phosphorylated peptides were identified by LC-MS-MS. Product ion scans were obtained for peptides with ioncounts greater than 250,000 c.p.s. (counts per second), withprecursor ion selection window of m/z 400-1600. Tandem massspectra were acquired from m/z 140-1400, upon the two mostintense peaks, which after two occurrences were excluded for 12seconds. Peptides encompassing phosphorylated S988(RDS(P)WSYINSK) and non-phosphorylated S978 (SILQEENR)were identified with probabilities of greater than 95% by thismethod. An ion corresponding to the m/z of phosphorylated S978(S(P)ILQEENR) was detected in the immunoprecipitated integrinby standard LC-MS-MS, but was not sufficiently abundant forpositive identification by sequence analysis. The scarcity ofS(P)ILQEENR indicates that if phosphorylation of S978 occurs,it is not a high stoichiometry event. Therefore we used a targetedapproach to examine loss of phosphate from low abundance ionsby multiple reaction monitoring. A synthetic phosphorylatedpeptide was used to obtain accurate empirical measurements ofthe m/z values of SILQEENR and S(P)ILQEENR. The syntheticphosphopeptide was infused into the mass spectrometer using asyringe pump, and the optimum collision energy needed to obtainthe neutral loss transition for the phosphopeptide of interest(534.7/485.7) was determined. The retention spectra of 2 fmol or50 amol of the phosphopeptide were also measured and showedpeak retention times of 11.85 and 11.89 minutes (Fig. 2C and datanot shown). Tryptic fragments of the immunoprecipitated,endogenous α4 integrin were then examined using the optimisedcollision energy for the specified transition (534.7/485.7), withproduct ion data being acquired upon observation of the transition,with greater than 100 c.p.s. Not only was an ion of 534.7/485.7transition detected, but the parent ion exhibited the same retentiontime (11.86 minutes) as the synthetic peptide (Fig. 2D).Collectively, these experiments show that S978 of the α4cytoplasmic domain is phosphorylated in both the chimeric andendogenous integrin. This finding demonstrates that the putative

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    14-3-3-binding motif identified by sequence analysis is indeedpresent in cells. The experiments also demonstrate thatphosphorylation of S978 occurs at lower stoichiometry thanphosphorylation of S988, which regulates paxillin binding.

    α4 integrin and 14-3-3 closely associate in adhesion contactsAssociation between 14-3-3 and the α4 cytoplasmic domain wastested in live cells using acceptor photobleaching fluorescenceresonance energy transfer (FRET). The C termini of the chimericintegrins were conjugated to green fluorescent protein (GFP) andcoexpressed with 14-3-3ζ conjugated to monomeric redfluorescent protein (mRFP). The veracity of the tagged integrinwas evident as expression supported cell spreading on 50K andthe formation of paxillin-containing focal adhesions, whereasuntransfected CHO-B2 cells were incapable of adhering to thisligand (data not shown). The 14-3-3ζ isoform was selected as ithas previously been implicated in integrin-mediated signalling(Bialkowska et al., 2003). Transiently transfected cells withintermediate fluorescent intensity were chosen for FRET analysisto avoid non-specific association between the integrin and 14-3-3as a result of overexpression (supplementary material Fig. S1A,C).FRET was detected in α5/α4-GFP-containing adhesion contacts,demonstrating the close (≤10 nm) proximity between the α4cytoplasmic domain and 14-3-3ζ, and suggesting a directassociation (Fig. 3A,D; supplementary material Fig. S2A). Thelevel of FRET between α5/α4-GFP and mRFP–14-3-3 was 24%,compared with background levels of 10% between mRFP–14-3-3and free GFP, or between α5/α4-GFP and free mRFP (data notshown). Engagement of a phosphorylated serine residue by thehighly conserved amphipathic groove in the 14-3-3 dimer is thekey event in 14-3-3 binding, and so we hypothesised thatsubstitution of S978A of α4 would prevent interaction with 14-3-3.No FRET was detected above background between α5/α4-S978A-GFP and mRFP–14-3-3, although both proteins did colocalize atthe cell edge, indicating that the mutation abolishes directassociation (Fig. 3B,D; supplementary material Fig. S2B).Phosphomimetic mutation of S978 (S978D), which would beexpected to enforce integrin–14-3-3 association, inducedwidespread FRET between the α4 cytoplasmic domain and14-3-3ζ (Fig. 3C,D; supplementary material Fig. S2C). The largedifference in the FRET of the phosphomimetic, compared with

    Fig. 2. Phosphorylation of the α4 cytoplasmic domain. (A,B) Theα5/α4 chimera, including point substitutions S988A andS978A/S988A were immunoprecipitated from transgenic CHO-B2cells, metabolically labelled with [32P]orthophosphate. Equivalentloading was tested by immunoblotting the α5 integrin extracellulardomain using H-104, and phosphorylation of the α4 cytoplasmicdomain was measured by autoradiography. (C) 2 fmol of syntheticpeptide corresponding to the α4 integrin cytoplasmic domain,phosphorylated at S978 was digested with trypsin and added to a 6-protein mix. The mix was infused into the mass spectrometer andthe retention spectrum was obtained for the peptide matching thespecific neutral phosphate loss transition (534.7/485.7). (D) Thelight chain of endogenous α4 integrin, immunoprecipitated fromA375 melanoma cell, was analysed using the protocol optimisedwith the synthetic peptide.

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  • 1657Integrin α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin complex

    the wild type, integrin is consistent with low stoichiometry ofphosphorylation of the wild-type integrin. FRET analyses wererepeated with CHO-B2 cells expressing full-length α4 integrin,to ascertain whether the interaction with 14-3-3 is a feature of thewild-type integrin. FRET between α4-GFP and mRFP–14-3-3 was33%, comparable with the chimeric integrin (Fig. 4A,D;supplementary material Fig. S3A). FRET was reduced to 16% inthe S978A mutant of α4 (Fig. 4B,D; supplementary material Fig.S3B) and more widely spread when enforced by the S978Dsubstitution (34%; Fig. 4C,D; supplementary material Fig. S3C).Taken together, the FRET data reveal an interaction between14-3-3ζ and the α4 cytoplasmic domain in integrin-containingadhesion contacts that is enhanced by the phosphomimeticsubstitution of S978.

    α4 integrin and 14-3-3 form a ternary complex with paxillinAs it has been reported previously that paxillin is essential for α4-mediated cellular responses (Liu et al., 1999), a potential functionallink between paxillin and 14-3-3 was explored. Previousinvestigations have used in vitro binding assays and mutant integrinsto establish paxillin binding (Liu et al., 2001; Liu et al., 1999), butthe low stoichiometry of the interaction has hampered studies ofthe endogenous interaction. The association of α4 integrin andpaxillin in vivo was verified by measuring FRET between the GFP-tagged integrin chimeras and mRFP-paxillin. The level of FRETbetween α5/α4-GFP and mRFP-paxillin was only 16% (Fig. 5A)but was reduced to 11% by the Y991A mutation (Fig. 5B), whichblocks paxillin binding in vitro (Liu et al., 2002). The differencein FRET efficiency of paxillin, compared with 14-3-3ζ was most

    Fig. 3. 14-3-3ζ interacts with thecytoplasmic domain of α4 integrin inadhesion contacts. CHO-B2 cellstransiently transfected with (A) α5/α4-GFP, (B) α5/α4-S978A-GFP and (C)α5/α4-S978D-GFP, were co-transfectedwith mRFP–14-3-3ζ and allowed toadhere to glass-bottomed Petri dishescoated with 10 μg/ml 50K. Spread cellswere then subjected to acceptorphotobleaching FRET. Line profilesindicate fluorescence intensity emitted bythe GFP-conjugated integrin subunits inadhesion contacts before and after mRFPphotobleaching. (D) The average peakFRET efficiency of all adhesion contactsper cell. Data are representative of 70-100adhesion contacts, and the experimentanalyzed 10 separate cells per line. Errorbars represent s.e.m. *P

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    probably a consequence of the proximity of the fluorophore to theintegrin-coupled GFP. Background FRET between mRFP-paxillinand free GFP was 10%, comparable to the Y991A mutant (data notshown). Unlike 14-3-3ζ FRET, in which there was comparableefficiency in small focal complexes and focal adhesions alike,paxillin FRET was more pronounced in established focal adhesions,which supports the existing model that paxillin does not bind to α4at the leading edge of the cell (Nishiya et al., 2005). This experimentdemonstrates that paxillin does indeed bind to α4 integrin in vivo,and does so in focal adhesions.

    In its active form, paxillin is phosphorylated at a large numberof serine residues (Webb et al., 2005), and it is conceivable thatthese sites could act as 14-3-3 ligands. A potential interactionbetween 14-3-3ζ and paxillin was tested by using a 14-3-3ζ-GSTpull-down approach to precipitate potential binding partners froma CHO-B2 cell lysate. Analysis of the precipitated proteins bywestern blotting revealed the previously characterized 14-3-3-binding partners Raf1 (Freed et al., 1994; Irie et al., 1994) andp130Cas (Garcia-Guzman et al., 1999), but also revealed anassociation with paxillin (Fig. 6A). GST alone did not precipitateany of these proteins. Furthermore, as vinculin and talin were notpulled down by 14-3-3ζ, it is unlikely that multi-molecularcomplexes of focal adhesion proteins were precipitated. To ensure

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    that interaction occurred at physiological protein concentrations,endogenous 14-3-3ζ was coimmunoprecipitated with paxillin fromCHO-K1 lysates (Fig. 6B). Similar association was detected in MEFand 3T3 lysates (data not shown), and α-actinin, which does notinteract with paxillin directly, did not co-precipitate with paxillinin these experiments (Fig. 6B). These data therefore reveal a novelassociation between paxillin and 14-3-3ζ, and raise the possibilitythat integrin α4, paxillin and 14-3-3ζ form a ternary complex.

    To test whether the involvement of paxillin was essential forbinding of 14-3-3ζ to α4 integrin, we conducted pull-down assays,using recombinant GST–14-3-3ζ coupled to Sepharose beads.Little wild-type or S978A α5/α4 was pulled down by GST–14-3-3ζ,which was consistent with the low stoichiometry of S978phosphorylation (Fig. 6C). As expected, substitution of the putativepaxillin-binding motif (Y991A), or substitution of both the paxillinand 14-3-3-binding motifs in combination did not improve bindingto 14-3-3ζ. Importantly, large amounts of integrin were precipitatedfrom cells expressing α5/α4-S978D/Y991A, demonstrating that α4integrin can bind to 14-3-3ζ independently of the paxillin-bindingmotif. The strong association between α5/α4-S978D/Y991A and14-3-3ζ, compared with wild-type α5/α4 integrin (Fig. 6C), wasalso consistent with the increased association detected by FRET(Fig. 3C), and the low stoichiometry of phosphorylation of S978(Fig. 2).

    Finally, we tested the complementary roles of 14-3-3ζ andpaxillin in ternary complex formation. FRET between α5/α4-GFPand mRFP–14-3-3ζ was reduced from 24% to a background level

    Fig. 4. 14-3-3ζ interacts with full-length α4 integrin in adhesion contacts.CHO-B2 cells transiently transfected with (A) α4-GFP, (B) α4-S978A-GFPand (C) α4-S978D-GFP, were co-transfected with mRFP–14-3-3ζ andsubjected to acceptor photobleaching FRET. (D) The average peak FRETefficiency of all adhesion contacts per cell. Data are representative of 70–100adhesion contacts, and the experiment analyzed 10 separate cells per line.Error bars represent s.e.m. *P

  • 1659Integrin α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin complex

    of 9% upon substitution of the paxillin-binding motif (Y991A; Fig.2A, Fig. 7A,B). The effect of Y991A on 14-3-3ζ-bindingdemonstrates that, in the absence of enforced α4–14-3-3ζassociation by S978D, paxillin is important for recruitment of14-3-3ζ to the integrin. The same result was obtained from the full-length integrin, with FRET reduced from 33% to 8% in cellsexpressing α4-Y991A-GFP (Fig. 7C,D). The reciprocal relationshipwas tested by examining the effect of 14-3-3 on paxillin recruitment.Upon substitution of the paxillin-binding motif of α5/α4 (Y991A),localisation of paxillin to early focal complexes, but not maturefocal adhesions, was compromised (Fig. 7E,F). However, paxillinrecruitment was restored by enforcing the association betweenα5/α4 and 14-3-3 (S978D/Y991A; Fig. 7E,F). Recruitment ofvinculin was unaffected (Fig. 7G). Collectively these experimentsshow that although α4 integrin, 14-3-3ζ, and paxillin are capableof forming pair-wise connections, association of endogenousmolecules requires formation of a ternary complex. It was interestingthat the Y991A substitution only compromised recruitment ofpaxillin to focal complexes (Fig. 7E, arrowheads) and not to maturefocal adhesions (Fig. 7E, arrows). The difference in recruitmentpatterns suggests that ternary complex formation is specificallyimportant for the formation of nascent focal complexes at a leadingedge.

    Formation of the α4–14-3-3-paxillin ternary complex isnecessary for regulation of Cdc42 during cell migrationThe Rho family GTPases, Rac1 and Cdc42, play essential roles inthe induction of vinculin- and paxillin-containing focal complexes

    at the leading edge of migrating cells (Burridge and Wennerberg,2004; Raftopoulou and Hall, 2004), yet despite considerable efforts,the direct link between adhesion receptor and localised GTPaseregulation remains poorly understood. Recent studies have revealedthat both GTPase regulation and focal complex formation, inresponse to engagement of the fibronectin receptor α5β1 integrin,require simultaneous engagement of a second matrix receptor,syndecan 4 (Bass et al., 2007). By contrast, integrin α4β1 supportedfocal adhesion formation that was independent of a second receptor(Mostafavi-Pour et al., 2003), which implies a direct link from theα4 cytoplasmic tail to GTPase regulation. The impact of theα4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin complex on Cdc42 and Rac1 activity wastherefore examined by effector pull-down assays. Disruption of thepaxillin binding motif of the α4 cytoplasmic tail (α5/α4-Y991A)caused an increase in Rac1 activity (Fig. 8A) that was consistentwith previous reports of reduced Rac1 activity upon enforcedpaxillin-α4 integrin association (Nishiya et al., 2005). However,mutation of the 14-3-3-binding motif (α5/α4-S978A) had no effecton Rac1 activity, and neither did it rescue Rac1 activity in thepaxillin-binding mutant (Fig. 8A). By contrast, Cdc42 activity wasmarkedly elevated in cells expressing α5/α4-S978A (Fig. 8B).Cdc42 activity was also slightly increased by α5/α4-Y991A, butcould be rescued by enforced association between α4 and 14-3-3in the α5/α4-S978D/Y991A double mutant. These resultsdemonstrate dysregulation of GTPase signalling upon disruption ofbinding motifs within the α4 cytoplasmic domain, with paxillinprimarily affecting Rac1 and 14-3-3 primarily affecting Cdc42. Itis interesting that similar dysregulation of Rac1 is observed insyndecan-4-null cells during α5β1-mediated adhesion (Bass et al.,2007), so that uncontrolled GTPase activity in cases of compromisedreceptor signalling appears to be a recurring theme.

    The role of 14-3-3ζ in localisation of active Cdc42 was examinedusing the Raichu-Cdc42 FRET probe (Itoh et al., 2002). In cellsexpressing the wild-type integrin α4 cytoplasmic domain, highFRET efficiency, indicating high Cdc42 activity, was focused alongthe leading edge of lamellipodia (Fig. 8C,G). By contrast, activeCdc42 was distributed diffusely in cells expressing either α5/α4-Y991A or α5/α4-S978A (Fig. 8D,E,G), confirming the role of theα4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin ternary complex in restricting Cdc42 activityto the leading edge. In the same way that enforced α4–14-3-3ζassociation rescued paxillin mislocalisation (Fig. 7E), localisedactive Cdc42 was restored in the α5/α4-S978D/Y991A doublemutant (Fig. 8F,G). In all cases, cells expressing a negative controlFRET probe, Raichu-Cdc42Y40C, displayed no FRET activity,demonstrating that the calculated ratios were indicative of activationrather than accumulation of the probe. The FRET data support theconcept that 14-3-3ζ, rather than paxillin, exerts the primaryinfluence over α4-dependent Cdc42 regulation, and that the complexrestricts active Cdc42 to the leading edge.

    The functional relevance of the interaction between integrin α4and 14-3-3ζ was investigated using a haptotactic cell migrationassay. Wild-type CHO-B2 cells were unable to migrate towards the50K central cell-binding domain fragment of fibronectin as theylack α5β1 expression, but transfection of the full-length α5 subunitstimulated efficient cell migration towards 50K (Fig. 8H). Cellmigration was increased by 40% by expression of the α5/α4 chimeracompared with expression of α5, indicative of the pro-migratorysignalling role of α4 integrins. Abrogation of the associationbetween α4 integrin and 14-3-3ζ by the S978A mutation reducedα5/α4-mediated haptotaxis to a level that was comparable to thatof wild-type α5 integrin (Fig. 8H). Thus, interaction between α4

    Fig. 6. Recombinant 14-3-3ζ interacts with both paxillin and α4 integrin.(A) CHO-B2 cell lysate was incubated with protein G-Sepharose beadsconjugated to GST or GST–14-3-3ζ and bound proteins analyzed by westernblotting. Blots were probed for paxillin, vinculin and talin as candidate bindingpartners, and Raf1 and p130Cas as known 14-3-3 interacting proteins.(B) Protein complexes were immunoprecipitated from CHO-K1 cells usinganti-paxillin or non-immune IgG. Precipitated proteins were blotted forpaxillin, 14-3-3ζ and α-actinin. (C) Lysates of mutant α5/α4 CHO-B2 lineswere incubated with protein G-Sepharose beads conjugated to GST orGST–14-3-3ζ and bound integrin was analyzed by western blotting. Blots ofbound Raf1 and total integrin were used as controls and to standardisequantification. Error bars represent s.e.m., *P

  • 1660

    integrin and 14-3-3ζ is a critical event in transduction of the pro-migratory signals of α4 integrin.

    DiscussionIn this study we identified a novel membrane-linked signallingcomplex comprising α4 integrin, 14-3-3ζ and paxillin. Initially, wedemonstrated pair-wise association between paxillin and 14-3-3ζby co-immunoprecipitation, α4 integrin and 14-3-3ζ by FRET, andconfirmed that the previously reported biochemical associationbetween α4 integrin and paxillin does indeed occur in vivo.Subsequently, we demonstrated that formation of the ternary

    Journal of Cell Science 122 (10)

    complex was regulated by the phosphorylation of two independentserine residues within the integrin α4 cytoplasmic tail, and thatsignalling defects caused by disruption of one of the binding sitescould be partially rescued by enforced association at the other.Together, these experiments revealed a close relationship betweencomponents of the ternary complex. The α4 integrin–14-3-3ζ–paxillin ternary complex was required for localised Cdc42activity, whereas association of α4 integrin and paxillin aloneappeared sufficient for Rac1 regulation. Finally we found that theassociation between α4 integrin and 14-3-3 made a criticalcontribution toward rapid haptotactic migration and the formation

    of nascent focal adhesions. Collectively theseexperiments describe a new mechanism ofα4β1 integrin signalling.

    α4β1 integrin has received a great deal ofattention as a therapeutic target because ofthe specific role in targeting leukocytemigration, in particular, from the circulationto the brain. Several pathologies have beenlinked to defects in α4β1 integrin;polymorphisms in the α4 gene that causeincreased expression of the integrin have beenlinked to susceptibility to multiple sclerosisby augmenting leukocyte migration acrossthe blood brain barrier (O’Doherty et al.,2007), persistent recruitment of leukocytes tothe intestine results in Crohn’s disease(Sandborn and Yednock, 2003), and α4β1-mediated adhesion has also been linked toother autoimmune diseases includingrheumatoid arthritis and diabetes (Kummerand Ginsberg, 2006). These defects have

    Fig. 7. Formation of a ternary complex stabilisesrecruitment of 14-3-3ζ and paxillin to α4 integrin.CHO-B2 cells transiently transfected with (A,B)α5/α4-Y991A-GFP and (C,D) α4-Y991A-GFP,were co-transfected with mRFP–14-3-3ζ andsubjected to acceptor photobleaching FRET.Representative images of FRET efficiency andoverlay of α5/α4-Y991A-GFP fluorescence beforeand after mRFP photobleaching are shown. Lineprofiles indicate fluorescence intensity emitted byα5/α4Y991A-GFP in adhesion contacts before andafter mRFP photobleaching. (B,D) The average peakFRET efficiency of all adhesion contacts per cell.Data are representative of 70-100 adhesion contacts,and each experiment analyzed seven separate cells.Error bars represent s.e.m.,*P≤0.05. Scale bars:5 μm. (E) Images of lamellipodial leading edges ofCHO-B2 cells expressing α5/α4, α5/α4-Y991A andα5/α4-S978D/Y991A integrin subunits. Cells wereallowed to adhere to coverslips coated with 10 μg/ml50K, fixed and stained for paxillin and actin.Paxillin images were converted to pixel intensityimages. Arrows indicate focal adhesions (largeadhesion plaques associated with the termini of actinstress fibres) and arrowheads the focal complexes(small adhesion plaques at the cell periphery). Scalebars: 3 μm. (F,G) Quantification of the pixelintensity at the leading edge of lamellipodia of cellsstained for paxillin (F) and vinculin (G) Data arerepresentative of three individual experiments andall protrusions in 15 cells/cell line were quantified.Error bars represent s.e.m. *P

  • 1661Integrin α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin complex

    prompted the development of a function-blocking anti-α4 antibody,natalizumab, which has been trialled as a treatment of Crohn’sdisease and relapsing multiple sclerosis with great success. However,in a limited number of cases, natalizumab treatment resulted inprogressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy as a result of increasedsusceptibility to viral infection (Baker, 2007), and the severity ofthis side effect highlights why the understanding of integrin α4signalling and development of more specific drugs is a therapeuticpriority. Not all integrin α4β1-related therapy is based uponinhibition of the integrin; tumour-reactive T cells have been targeted

    to intracranial lesions by expression of α4β1 integrin during thetreatment of tumours of the central nervous system (Sasaki et al.,2007). The range of leukocyte-based therapies and in particular thepotential side effects make it clear that a detailed understanding ofα4β1 integrin function is necessary.

    The pro-migratory activity of α4β1 integrin must be explainedby unique features of the integrin, which in many respects resemblesthe ubiquitously expressed α5β1 integrin. This study has focusedon the importance of the α4–14-3-3–paxillin complex, and thepotential of both 14-3-3ζ and paxillin to act as scaffolds may be

    important for the creation of a signallingnexus (Turner, 2000; Tzivion et al., 2006).The connection from α4β1 to GTPasesignalling, in the absence of a ligand for asecond matrix receptor, is of particularinterest. The role of syndecan 4 in theregulation of GTPases Rac1 and RhoAdownstream of α5β1 integrin is nowestablished (Bass et al., 2008; Bass et al.,2007), and the independence of α4β1 integrinmay explain the difference between thetwo integrins. It is understood thatphosphorylation of the α4-paxillin-bindingmotif, in the protruding lamella, restrictsactive Rac1 to the leading edge by confiningpaxillin binding, which in turn blocks Rac1activation, to the sides and rear of the cell(Nishiya et al., 2005). The inability of 14-3-3binding to rescue Rac1 activity uponsubstitution of the paxillin-binding motifsuggests that the molecules fulfil divergent aswell as mutually supportive roles, which maybe important for focal adhesion maturation.14-3-3 recruitment appears to be a veryearly event in focal complex nucleation.Phosphorylation of S978 directly influencesCdc42, which is one of the earliest signalsduring formation of pioneering focalcomplexes and establishment of cellpolarity (Burridge and Wennerberg, 2004;

    Fig. 8. The interactions of α4 integrin with 14-3-3ζand paxillin regulate localised GTPase activation.Rac1 activity (A) and Cdc42 activity (B) of α5/α4-expressing CHO-B2 lines spread on 50K, measuredby affinity precipitation using GST-PAK. Error barsrepresent s.e.m., *P≤0.05, n=5 and 10 for Rac1 andCdc42, respectively. (C-F) Raichu-Cdc42 and controlRaichu-Cdc42Y40C FRET probes were transientlytransfected into CHO-B2 cells expressing (C) α5/α4,(D) α5/α4-S978A, (E) α5/α4-Y991A and (F) α5/α4-S978D/Y991A adhered to a 50K substratum. Scalebar: 20 μm. (G) Quantification of cells for restrictionof Cdc42 activity to the leading edge. Data arerepresentative of 20 cells per experiment, performedon four separate occasions, error bars represents.e.m., **P

  • 1662

    Raftopoulou and Hall, 2004). The locality, rather than the level, ofGTPase activity is the key factor in determining cell polarity andis reflected in this study by the observation that the S978Asubstitution prevents rapid migration, despite causing high,mislocalised Cdc42 activity. 14-3-3 has already been reported toassociate with the leukocyte integrin αLβ2 (LFA-1) and tocontribute to the regulation of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity in T cells(Nurmi et al., 2007). The ability of the 14-3-3 family of proteinsto associate directly with two leukocyte integrins indicates apossible role in immune cell function, and suggests that thisinteraction may be a target for therapeutic intervention duringinflammatory diseases. 14-3-3ζ has also been implicated in GTPaseregulation in platelets (Bialkowska et al., 2003). Sequestration of14-3-3ζ by the transmembrane glycoprotein GP Ib-IX preventedactivation of Cdc42 and Rac1 in response to engagement of αIIbβ3integrin, resulting in compromised cell spreading. Although directassociation of 14-3-3 with αIIbβ3 integrin has not beendemonstrated, collectively the reports do suggest an active role for14-3-3 in the GTPase signalling complex.

    Of equal note was the identification of a transient interactionbetween 14-3-3β and the cytoplasmic tails of β1 and β3 integrinsubunits during the early stages of cell spreading (Han D. C. et al.,2001). Despite the absence of a consensus phosphoserine residuefrom the integrin β-tails, 14-3-3β coimmunoprecipitated with theintegrin and overexpression increased the rates of cell spreadingand migration on fibronectin. The presence of putative 14-3-3-binding motifs in both cytoplasmic domains of α4β1 integrin couldmake the integrin a high affinity ligand for dimeric 14-3-3. Thefact that FRET was lost upon substitution of S987A, despite the β1tail remaining intact, demonstrated the importance of the α4 motifand could explain why, unlike α5β1 integrin, α4β1 integrin doesnot require cooperation with a second receptor for the initiation ofdownstream signalling events.

    The presence of 14-3-3-binding motifs within the cytoplasmicdomains of both integrin subunits raises certain questions aboutspatial arrangement, as it is inconceivable that a single 14-3-3molecule could simultaneously bind α4, β1 and paxillin while atthe same time α4 integrin binds both 14-3-3 and paxillin. Basedon crystal structures, a generic model of integrin activation involvingstages of clustering, unbending, leg separation and conformationalrearrangement of the ligand-binding pocket that results in increasedligand affinity has been developed (Luo et al., 2007). Ligand-bindingand intramolecular FRET experiments have shown that the modelis applicable to α4β1 integrin (Chigaev et al., 2007). One attractivehypothesis is that sequential recruitment of 14-3-3 integrin andpaxillin would facilitate reorientation of the integrin legs, allowingthe recruitment of other integrin activators, such as talin (Garcia-Alvarez et al., 2003) and causing the gradual development of focalcomplexes (Fig. 9). The efficiency of FRET between theα4 subunitand 14-3-3ζ in all adhesion complexes, compared with paxillinFRET, which was minimal in focal complexes, supports the modelof sequential recruitment. The interaction between α4 and paxillinaround the periphery of the leading edge has already been foundto prevent off-axial Rac1 activation (Nishiya et al., 2005), and itappears that the α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin ternary complex might exerta similar influence over Cdc42. If binding of 14-3-3 to α4β1 isindeed an early event in integrin activation one would hypothesisethat phosphorylation of S988, regulating paxillin binding, couldcommit the integrin to either GTPase activation at the leading edgeor paxillin binding and GTPase suppression around the peripheryof the cell. Resolving the dynamics and recruitment hierarchy of

    Journal of Cell Science 122 (10)

    molecules is a difficult challenge, as focal complexes have such ashort lifetime themselves, but this is now a priority if we are tounderstand fully how α4β1 integrin is involved in such efficientcell migration.

    Materials and MethodsMaterialsRecombinant fibronectin polypeptides encompassing type III repeats 6-10 (50K) and12-15 including the alternatively spliced IIICS domain (H/120) were expressed asrecombinant polypeptides as described previously (Danen et al., 1995; Sharma et al.,1999). The human 14-3-3ζ construct was a gift from Carol Mackintosh (Universityof Dundee, UK), the human paxillin construct a gift from Vic Small (IMBA, Vienna,Austria), and the mRFP construct a gift from Roger Y. Tsien (University of California,CA). 14-3-3ζ and paxillin were subcloned using 5� BamHI and 3� EcoRI restrictionsites into pGEX-4T-1 and mRFPN vectors to generate N-terminal glutathione S-transferase and mRFP tags, respectively. The α5/α4 cDNA was constructed byengineering a HindIII restriction site into the α4 cDNA between the transmembraneand cytoplasmic domains, and subsequently subcloning the extracellular/transmembrane domains of the α5 subunit and the cytoplasmic domain of the α4subunit into the NotI and XbaI restriction sites of pcDNA3.1. Point mutations wereintroduced into the cytoplasmic domain of the α5/α4 chimera by site-directedmutagenesis, and mutant chimeras were then subcloned into the ClaI and PinAIrestriction sites of pcDNA3.1-EGFP-hyg+ by PCR amplification of the integrin cDNA.The following antibodies were used for immunofluorescence and western blotting:hVin-1, mouse anti-human vinculin monoclonal (1:400; Sigma-Aldrich); 349 mouseanti-human paxillin monoclonal (1:400), H-104 rabbit anti-human α5 integrinmonoclonal (1:500), mouse anti-human Raf1 monoclonal (1:1000), and mouse anti-human p130Cas monoclonal (1:1000) from BD Transduction Laboratories; C-16 rabbitanti-human 14-3-3ζ polyclonal (1:200) and C-20 goat anti-human talin (1:1000) fromSanta Cruz Biotechnology. FITC-conjugated anti-mouse IgG was purchased fromJackson (Stratech Scientific, Luton, UK), and Alexa-Fluor-680-conjugated anti-mouseIgG and TRITC-conjugated phalloidin from Molecular Probes (Invitrogen, Paisley,UK). mAb16 rat anti-human α5 integrin monoclonal, for flow cytometry andimmunoprecipitation, was a gift from Ken Yamada (NIH, Bethesda, MD).

    Cell cultureChinese hamster ovary B2 (CHO-B2) cells were cultured in Dulbecco’s modifiedEagle’s medium (DMEM) with L-glutamine and sodium pyruvate, supplemented with10% (v/v) foetal calf serum, 10 mM MEM non-essential amino acids, 2 mM L-glutamine and 1% (v/v) penicillin and streptomycin. Transfections were performedon cells at 60-80% confluency using Lipofectamine 2000 (Invitrogen). For FRETanalyses, CHO-B2 cells were co-transfected with the various α5/α4-GFP cDNAs,mRFP–14-3-3ζ, and mRFP-paxillin were used 24 hours post-transfection, withoutcell sorting. For biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses, homogeneousintegrin expression between cell lines, transfected with the various α5/α4 integrincDNAs, was achieved by fluorescence-activated sorting of cells labelled with mAb16and a FITC-conjugated secondary antibody, using an Aria flow cytometer (BDBiosciences). Sorted populations were maintained in 0.2 mg/ml G418 (Calbiochem).Expression levels of both transiently transfected and sorted cells were assessed using

    Fig. 9. Schematic model of the effects of 14-3-3ζ or paxillin binding to α4integrin in different areas of the membrane.

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  • 1663Integrin α4–14-3-3ζ–paxillin complex

    a Cyan flow cytometer (Dako). A375 human melanoma cells, which expressendogenous α4β1 integrin, were cultured in DMEM supplemented with L-glutamineand 10% (v/v) foetal calf serum.

    ImmunofluorescenceGlass coverslips, derivatized with 1 mM sulpho-m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester, were coated with 10 μg/ml 50K or H/120 for 1 hour andblocked with 10 mg/ml heat-denatured bovine serum albumin. CHO-B2 cells(5�104) in DMEM with 25 mM Hepes were added to the coverslips, and the cellswere incubated for 90 minutes at 37°C. Spread cells were fixed with 4% (w/v)paraformaldehyde, permeabilised with 0.5% (v/v) Triton X-100 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and blocked with 3% (w/v) BSA in PBS. Fixed cells werestained for vinculin, paxillin and actin, and photographed using a DeltavisionRTmicroscope (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA) with a 60� NA 1.42 PlanApo objectiveand Photometrics CH350 camera microscope.

    Metabolic labellingCHO-B2 cells expressing α5/α4-S988A, or α5/α4-S978A/S988A were sorted using1 μg mAb16 and anti-rat IgG-conjugated magnetic beads (Dynal) to achievehomogeneous integrin expression across the population. At 70% confluence, cells weremoved into serum-free, phosphate-free medium (Invitrogen) for 1 hour to allowdephosphorylation of the integrin, before supplementing the medium with 0.3 mCi/ml[32P]orthophosphate (GE Healthcare), 10% (v/v) dialysed foetal calf serum (Invitrogen),and labelling for 4 hours at 37°C, 5% (v/v) CO2. Labelled cells were washed with50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5, and lysed in 50 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.5), 150 mM NaCl, 1%(v/v) Triton X-100, 0.5% (w/v) sodium deoxycholate, 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecylsulfate, 10 mM MgCl2, 5 mM EGTA, 0.5 mM AEBSF [4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride], 25 μg/ml aprotinin, 25 μg/ml leupeptin, 5 mM Na2VO4, 10 mMNaF, 1� phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1 (Sigma-Aldrich). Clarified lysates were pre-cleared for 30 minutes with protein G-Sepharose (Zymed) and non-immune rat IgG,before immunoprecipitating the chimeric integrins using 1 μg mAb16 monoclonalantibody and protein G-Sepharose. Proteins were solubilised in SDS sample buffer andresolved by reducing SDS-PAGE. Dried PAGE gels were exposed to a phosphorimagerscreen overnight, and scanned using a Bio-Rad, Molecular Imager FX.

    Phosphorylation analysis by mass spectrometryA synthetic peptide corresponding to the α4 cytoplasmic, phosphorylated on S978(GFFKRQYKS(P)ILQEENRRDSWSYINSKSNDD) was purchased from Genosys(Sigma).

    Infusion/optimizationFor optimization studies, the peptide was infused into the mass spectrometer usinga syringe pump. The optimum collision energy needed to obtain the neutral losstransition for the phosphopeptide of interest (534.7/485.7) was determined.

    ImmunoprecipitationA375 melanoma cells, spread on H/120 for 60 minutes were lysed in 50 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.5), 150 mM NaCl, 1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 0.5% (w/v) sodiumdeoxycholate, 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate, 5 mM EGTA, 0.5 mM AEBSF,25 μg/ml aprotinin, 25 μg/ml leupeptin, 5 mM Na2VO4, 10 mM NaF, 1� phosphataseinhibitor cocktail 1 (Sigma-Aldrich), 50 nM Calyculin A, 1 μM okadaic acid. Clarifiedlysates were pre-cleared for 30 minutes with protein G-Sepharose (Zymed) and non-immune rat IgG, before immunoprecipitating the chimeric integrins using 1 μg HP2/1monoclonal antibody and protein G-Sepharose.

    Liquid chromatographySamples were concentrated on a pre-column (20 mm�180 μm i.d.; Waters, Manchester,UK). The peptides were then separated using a gradient from 99% A (0.1% FA inwater) and 1% B (0.1% FA in acetonitrile) to 30% B, in 40 minutes at 300 nl/minute,using a 150 mm�100 μm i.d. 1.7 μM BEH C18, analytical column (Waters).

    Tandem mass spectrometryProduct ion scans were obtained for peptides with ion counts greater than 250,000cps, with precursor ion selection window of m/z 400-1600. Tandem mass spectrawere acquired from m/z 140-1400, upon the two most intense peaks, which after twooccurrences were excluded for 12 seconds.

    Targeted mass spectrometryUsing the optimised collision energy for the specified transition, an MRM methodwas set up, with product ion data being acquired upon observation of the transition,with greater than 100 c.p.s.

    EquipmentAll data were acquired using a NanoAcquity LC (Waters) coupled to a 4000 Q-TRAP(Applied Biosystems, Framingham, MA).

    Acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer(FRET)35-mm glass-bottomed, poly-L-lysine-coated, γ-irradiated dishes (Mat-tek) werecoated with 10 μg/ml 50K diluted in Dulbecco’s PBS containing calcium and

    magnesium (BioWhittaker) for 2 hours. To prevent non-specific cell binding, thedishes were blocked with 10 mg/ml heat-denatured bovine serum albumin for 30minutes. 5�104 cells were added to each well and allowed to attach and spread for90 minutes at 37°C, 5% (v/v) CO2. Non-transfected cells, which were unable to adhereto the substratum, were removed by washing with PBS. The attached cells were thenfixed for 20 minutes at room temperature with 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde dilutedin PBS. The coverslips were then washed with PBS and paraformaldehyde quenchedwith 0.1 M glycine in PBS for 20 minutes. Fixed cells were photographed in the GFPchannel on a DeltavisionRT microscope using a 100� NA 1.35 UPlanApo objectiveand Photometrics CH350 camera at 2�2 binning. To calculate FRET efficiencies, aGFP image (donor) was captured before and after photobleaching the mRFP(acceptor) in the RFP channel. Following background subtraction, percentage FRETefficiency was calculated, on a pixel by pixel basis, as 100�[1–(donor intensity beforephotobleaching/donor intensity after photobleaching)], using ImageJ software (WayneRasband, NIH, Bethesda, MD; http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/). FRET images weredisplayed as a colour intensity scale. Percentage FRET efficiency values representthe average peak FRET efficiency of 100-150 adhesion contacts, defined by integrinclustering, of each individual cell. Two-tailed t-tests were used for statistical analysis.

    GST pull-down assay and immunoprecipitationIn vitro association of GST–14-3-3ζ with α5/α4 mutants or paxillin was assessedby GST pull-down. CHO-B2 cells were resuspended to 6�106 cells/ml in lysis buffer(20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.2, 150 mM NaCl, 10 mM EDTA, 1% (v/v) Triton X-100,2 mM AEBSF, 5 mg/ml aprotinin, 5 mg/ml leupeptin, 2 mM sodium vanadate, 10mM NaF) and incubated at 4°C for 10 minutes. The lysates were cleared and thesupernatant incubated with GST or GST–14-3-3ζ beads for 2 hours at 4°C. Forcoimmunoprecipitation studies, CHO-K1 cells were lysed as above and the supernatantcleared with protein G-Sepharose beads and 1 μg/ml mouse IgG at 4°C. Thesupernatant was incubated with mouse IgG- or anti-paxillin-coated beads overnightat 4°C. For both methods, the beads were washed, and bound protein were resolvedby SDS-PAGE and transferred to nitrocellulose.

    Rac1 and Cdc42 effector pull-down assayCells were allowed to adhere to 50K or kept in suspension, and lysed in 20 mMHepes, pH 7.4, 10% (v/v) glycerol, 140 mM NaCl, 1% (v/v) NP-40, 0.5% (w/v)sodium deoxycholate, 4 mM EGTA, 4 mM EDTA, 1 mM AEBSF, 50 μg/ml aprotinin,100 μg/ml leupeptin. Clarified lysates were incubated for 1 hour at 4°C with GST-PAK CRIB domain beads, before washing the beads with lysis buffer. Active GTPasewas eluted in SDS sample buffer, resolved by SDS-PAGE and transferred tonitrocellulose.

    Quantitative western blottingTransferred proteins were detected using the Odyssey western blotting fluorescentdetection system (LI-COR Biosciences UK, Cambridge, UK). This involved blockingthe membranes with blocking buffer (LI-COR Biosciences UK, Cambridge, UK) andthen incubating with the primary antibodies diluted 1:1000 in blocking buffer, 0.1%(v/v) Tween 20. Membranes were washed with PBS, 0.1% (v/v) Tween 20 andincubated with Alexa-Fluor-680-conjugated anti-mouse IgG diluted 1:5000 inblocking buffer, 0.1% (v/v) Tween 20. After rinsing the membrane, proteins weredetected using an infrared imaging system that allowed both an image of the membraneand an accurate count of bound protein to be recorded. For all experiments, equivalentloading between cell lines was confirmed by blotting the crude lysate for total GTPase.For quantification, values for active GTPase were adjusted for the slight variationsin total GTPase. Paired t-tests between bands on the same gel were used for statisticalanalysis.

    Haptotactic migration assayMigration assays were performed using Transwell chambers (Costar). The lowersurface of the membrane was coated with 10 μg/ml 50K in PBS containing calciumand magnesium for 2 hours at 37°C. Both the top and the bottom chambers werethen blocked with 0.5% (w/v) BSA in serum-free medium for 30 minutes at roomtemperature. After washing, 1�105 CHO-B2 cells were added to the top chamberand allowed to migrate at 37°C for 4 hours. The cells were subsequently trypsinisedfrom the upper and lower chambers and counted using a Coulter counter. Two-tailedt-tests were used for statistical analysis.

    Raichu-Cdc42 FRETThe Raichu-Cdc42 and Raichu-Cdc42Y40C FRET probes, a gift from MichiyukiMatsuda (Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Japan) (Itohet al., 2002) were transfected into CHO-B2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. Followingtransfection, 28 hours later, cells were allowed to spread on 50K-coated 35-mm glass-bottomed, poly-L-lysine, γ-irradiated Petri dishes coated with 10 μg/ml 50K. Cellswere fixed with 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde in PBS, washed and paraformaldehydequenched with 0.1 M glycine in PBS– for 20 minutes. Images were acquired usinga DeltavisionRT microscope using a 100� NA 1.35 UPlanApo objective andPhotometrics CH350 camera at 3�3 binning in the following order: (1) CFP(excitation filter, EX) with CFP (emission filter, EM); (2) CFP (EX) with YFP (EM)and YFP (EX) with YFP (EM). After subtraction of background, a ratio image was

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  • produced of CFP:YFP to CFP:CFP to give the ratio of YFP to CFP emitted. Imageswere then displayed in a colour intensity scale. Image processing was performedusing the ImageJ software.

    This work was supported by grants 045225 and 074941 from theWellcome Trust (to M.J.H.). The Bioimaging Facility microscopes andthe Biomolecular Analysis Facility Q-Trap mass spectrometer used inthis study were purchased with grants from BBSRC, Wellcome Trustand the University of Manchester Strategic Fund. We would like tothank Blanche Schwappach (University of Manchester, Manchester,UK) for discussion of 14-3-3 ligand engagement. Deposited in PMCfor release after 6 months.

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