Amber Tompsett , Steve Wiseman, Eric Higley , Hong Chang John P. Giesy , and Markus Hecker

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Characterization of the morphological, phenotypic, and molecular effects of 17 α -ethynylestradiol exposure during early development in Xenopus laevis. Amber Tompsett , Steve Wiseman, Eric Higley , Hong Chang John P. Giesy , and Markus Hecker. Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Characterization of the morphological, phenotypic, and molecular effects of 17-ethynylestradiol exposure during early development in Xenopus laevisAmber Tompsett, Steve Wiseman, Eric Higley, Hong Chang John P. Giesy, and Markus Hecker

SETAC North America Annual MeetingPortland, OR, USANovember 7-11, 2010Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan

IntroductionEstrogenic chemicals in the environmentExposure hypothesized to cause adverse effectsFeminization/demasculinization of malesWide variety of species are affected by exposure

17-ethynylestradiol (EE2)Potent estrogen of environmental concernPresent in oral contraceptivesNot fully removed by conventional sewage treatmentDetectable in surface water

IntroductionXenopus laevisCommon laboratory amphibianExquisitely sensitive to estrogenic exposures during sexual differentiationMale-to-female phenotypic sex reversalRecently discovered sex-linked gene

EE2 and X. laevis used as model systemsMorphological and phenotypic effects of EE2 exposureMolecular effects underlying sex reversal

Experimental designDosing Regime*FETAX control and 0.0025% ethanol solvent control0.1, 1, and 10 g/L EE2

Tadpole samplesNear sexual differentiation

Experiment terminated at 96 dMorphometrics and phenotypingMolecular samplesHistological samples

*Estrogen equivalent concentrations in surface water normally range from 3-30 ng/LDays to MetamorphosisSurvival analysis followed by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukeys test; significant differences (p